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Grand Theft Auto 5 Online is finally here. Just like the game's one-player mode, there's a bunch of stuff to do and a lot to absorb. Here, we give you 10 things to avoid at the beginning. 10.) Driving Like a Maniac Sure, it's a joy...
Grand Theft Auto 5 Online is finally here. Just like the game's one-player mode, there's a bunch of stuff to do and a lot to absorb. Here, we give you 10 things to avoid at the beginning. 10.) Driving Like a Maniac Sure, it's a joy to drive fast and perform stunts. Doing so can increase your driving ability, but that's not to say it doesn't have some drawbacks. Driving like a lunatic can draw a lot of attention. You might get off on the wrong foot with other players and they may judge you for your driving methods (thus, losing your rep). It also makes cops very angry, and can create a huge distraction if you're currently involved in an event. Vehicles lose value if you deliver them to Simeon in bad condition. Above all else, it can hurt your character and even worse, result in death. Death is the worst punishment because you'll have to steal your car back (and deal with the police), or pay an $800-insurance fee to get it back each time. That is a lot of money to waste and will drain your account quickly. Unless there's an emergency or you're attempting to escape a situation, take your time and drive safe. 9.) Turning Your Back on Someone Finding people you can trust is essential when playing GTA Online. It's not smart to hang with the wrong people. Completing missions with others can win you decent cash and rank points, but players always have the option to rob each other before or after a job session ends. Either defend yourself immediately or get away in a vehicle pronto if they're nearby. Additionally, keep an eye on cashiers when fleeing a store robbery - some carry a firearm. 8.) Playing Without a Headset If you don't have a headset for your console, we strongly recommend getting one. Besides a store robbery going more smoothly, communication is vital in GTA Online. You'll want to make friends and chat together without the hassle of texting each other. Most importantly, many players tend to use their mics, so eavesdropping can give you an understanding of what's happening in the session and help you figure out what other player's intentions are. 7.) Pretending You Know Everything Right Away As we stated above, you'll want to take your best skills and use them in proper scenarios. That said, dig your teeth in multiple activities and try several match types, then get accustomed to them. If Team Deathmatch is your thing, give all the maps a try; this way you can familiarize yourself with the levels, locate special items and know what you're getting into. That way, you'll develop more confidence and bet some money on matches. Remember, practice makes perfect. 6.) Competing in Activities You're Not Good at Everyone has different tastes for activities and many of their skills are diverse. Are you good at driving? Participate in a race and make players eat your dust. Not too shabby at Tennis? Head to a tennis court and face off with another player. The sky is literally the limit in GTA Online; you have numerous activities you can partake in that can earn you cash and RP (rank points), or to boost up your skills. However, you may come up short with parachuting or flying. In this case, try not to involve yourself in a flying scenario or competitions. Invest your time with what you're good at and you'll rank up faster. 5.) Blowing Your Money on Unneeded Items It's important to spend your earnings on things you need first (check the What to Buy tips for more details). You'll need to save a decent amount of money to be successful online, and wasting it on expensive clothes or outrageous cars is a big risk considering most things are open for other players to steal. Think of what you need - not what you want. 4.) Stealing a Car and Forgetting to Repaint If you plan to keep a stolen vehicle, we recommend changing its paint color. Cops are smart in GTA Online and can smell a crook a mile away. Although police chases are inevitable, some missions require you to get a paint job at mod s
about 1 hour ago
We cover plenty of new games here at Gamezebo every week, but the number of games we've already covered that show up on new platforms? It's staggering. This Wednesday and every Wednesday, Gamezebo is rounding up the games that aren't q...
We cover plenty of new games here at Gamezebo every week, but the number of games we've already covered that show up on new platforms? It's staggering. This Wednesday and every Wednesday, Gamezebo is rounding up the games that aren't quite new, but might be new to you depending on your platform of choice. And who doesn't love new(ish) games?This week's highlights include venturing into a snarky cave on iPhone and iPad, using your virtual chainsaw to end the zombie apocalypse on PC, and managing some tycoon-worthy transportation networks on Android. Ron Gilbert's The Cave is now on iPhone and iPad New to PCChainsaw WarriorRoyal Envoy: Campaign for the Crown (Standard Edition)The Tiny TaleRiddles of Fate: Wild Hunt (Standard Edition) New to MacRiddles of Fate: Wild Hunt (Standard Edition)Monument Builders: Colosseum New to iPhoneThe CaveJewels of Cleopatra 2: Aztec MysteriesFear for Sale: The Mystery of McInroy Manor New to iPadThe CaveGrim Tales: The Stone QueenFear for Sale: The Mystery of McInroy ManorTales of Lagoona: Orphans of the Ocean New to AndroidTransport Tycoon
about 1 hour ago
It's surprising just how massively unsettling Knock-Knock becomes. Despite the artsy, comic-like visuals and 2D-on-3D animations, I could feel a knot in the pit of my stomach throughout my entire playthrough. I didn't think that I'd be r...
It's surprising just how massively unsettling Knock-Knock becomes. Despite the artsy, comic-like visuals and 2D-on-3D animations, I could feel a knot in the pit of my stomach throughout my entire playthrough. I didn't think that I'd be roped into the game's dark world as much as I was; yet I felt on edge within moments of booting the game up.You can give the "gets horror right" box a great big tick, then - although other elements of the game aren't so well established, thanks to repetitive gameplay mechanics, dialogue that is touch-and-go, and some incredibly odd level inclusions. Knock-Knock is an extremely unique experience, and as with many unique games, it stumbles as much as it innovates.You are an unnamed crazy guy living in the woods. Said crazy man has a touch of the old insomnia, and chooses to wander the halls of his house at night instead of going to sleep. The problem is that every time he wakes up he's in a completely different house. Oh, and there are horrible monsters roaming the halls, and creaking and knocking coming from every direction.The aim of Knock-Knock is simple - survive each night until the sun comes up. As you tiptoe around each house, the clock in the corner of the screen will keep ticking away, and you can find special machines that will advance time more quickly. However, the further that time progresses, the more dangerous the monsters in the house will become. If one gives chase and touches you, the clock will rewind and you'll have to survive for even longer. If you touch too many monsters, you'll have to start all over again.Knock-Knock is freaky as hell. It's the noises, mainly - creaks, moans, voices, knocking, and all sorts of other sounds emanate from the walls around you, and unfortunately it's often the case that you'll have to move towards the noises rather than away. Darkness consumes Knock-Knock's world too, and although you can screw in the lights in each room to bring a little brightness to your surroundings, this is often a stopgap for the horror, rather than a fix.This is a game that sets out to frighten, and easily manages this goal. As you wander the halls, the game will let you know where trouble is brewing - it's then up to you whether you head towards the trouble to see if you can solve it, or stay the heck away. There are no obvious rules or methods for beating Knock-Knock other than "don't get caught," and you are able to hide behind specific objects in some rooms. However, when you do hide the time will begin to rewind slowly, meaning that you can't just sit behind an object and wait until morning.It's a very unique twist on the horror genre, and one that works to a certain degree. I've certainly never played anything like this, and the lack of any real explanation as to how you should best tackle the game actually comes across as a plus point, adding to the horror and intrigue. It's certainly made me wary of ever staying in a dingy old house in the woods any time soon - especially a house that keeps changing shape every day.But while Knock-Knock offers unparalleled video game horror and action the likes of which you'll have never seen before, other areas of this experimental game don't work so well. Most notably, the game becomes very repetitive rather quickly. Several levels in, I realized that I wasn't going to get much more than the action I had already witnessed - the houses change formation, but the actual gameplay itself remains unchanged and barely adds anything new as you progress, meaning that when you've seen one house, you've seen them all.There's also a very strange outside section between each house that doesn't appear to make much sense. You wander through the woods looking for your house, and this involves simply walking in random directions until you find the next abode. It's not very fun, especially after multiple turns, and the game could have really done without it.The game's story is hit-and-miss, too. The protagonist talks ... (Read More)
about 2 hours ago
It seems sort of blasphemous to say, but old Captain Jack Sparrow got overexposed. Sure, we all love Johnny Depp's eccentric rogue; it's just that he wears on you after seeing him in four movies, video games, and everything else Disney h...
It seems sort of blasphemous to say, but old Captain Jack Sparrow got overexposed. Sure, we all love Johnny Depp's eccentric rogue; it's just that he wears on you after seeing him in four movies, video games, and everything else Disney has devised. Ironically, Pirates of the Caribbean: Isles of War could use more of Captain Jack or his friends to keep it from turning into just another social RPG/builder with a pirate theme - which it does a little too often.The shame of it is that the game starts out with oh so much promise. Right after we learn that Isles of War is set before Curse of the Black Pearl, we get a quick reintroduction to Sparrow while we're learning the click-and-drag controls so we can navigate the high seas. In classic Pirates fashion, Jack ends up deciding that discretion is the better part of valor the first time there's trouble, forcing the "Two Brave Heroes" chapter to become "One Brave Hero" as he heads the other way. With the familiar music from the films playing in the background, it sets the perfect tone as you begin your adventures.A double cross ensues, naturally, and without giving too much away, let's just say you end up in need of a ship and Sparrow possibly requires rescuing. That's when we get down to business learning the builder side of the game, as you set up shop on an island that needs your aid as much as you need its resources. There's really not much new to see here: you build structures to increase your stores of lumber and iron, while erecting defenses on the island and researching new ships and cannons.Once you have a fleet assembled, you can set sail into the Caribbean, which is occupied by both NPC fleets and the islands that other players call home. You're safe from unwanted PvP for several days as a newbie, though you can end that period early if you feel like clashing with others right away. NPCs can be attacked at your discretion since they don't mess with you on their own: something that eliminates any feeling of danger when you're sailing around on the world map.Naval battles see you taking an active role, though they're not terribly complex. The idea is to use your mouse to control the speed and heading of your flagship in order to maximize the time enemy ships are in your port and starboard firing arcs while minimizing your exposure to opposing cannons. Since you can outfit your ships with guns of different ranges and effects, especially as you progress further in the game, there is some decent strategy involved. But since the other ships in your fleet follow your flagship in a straight line and the bad guys fight the same way, it becomes a weird case of follow-the-leader at sea, and therefore not very realistic.NPC strongholds can be attacked in a similar fashion, except then you're dealing with static guns and defenses instead of ships. Either way, victory is achieved by destroying everything on the other side within five minutes, and there's always plunder in the form of resources and experience points. Leveling up doesn't do much for your character though, making the RPG side of things feel pretty light.Quests can give you direction when you need it, and they're mandatory for advancing the storyline so you can interact with Jack and other familiar faces again. The big problem is that the main quests are very grind-oriented (like when you're tasked with gathering large amounts of one resource), which breaks up the narrative quite a bit. Or as Joel Hodgson and the 'bots once sang in their own pirate shanty, "Slow the plot down laddy, slow the plot down!" Gold can help speed things up, but Playdom is pretty stingy with the premium currency and buying it with real money is your only option.Isles of War isn't quite eye candy, but it's not too shabby in that department either. The developers went with a look that makes everything look like it was hand-painted, and there's a nice sense of motion as people go about their daily routines on your island and ... (Read More)
about 3 hours ago
After already announcing a fifth entry in their critically acclaimed Dracula series earlier this summer, not to mention the long-awaited third installment in the iconic Syberia saga, developer Microids is showing no signs of slowing down...
After already announcing a fifth entry in their critically acclaimed Dracula series earlier this summer, not to mention the long-awaited third installment in the iconic Syberia saga, developer Microids is showing no signs of slowing down anytime soon, with a brand new detective-themed point-and-click adventure that will have gamers cracking the dream-like case by the end of the month.Taking place in the bustling 1930s, Dream Chamber follows the adventures of a rich heir named Charlie, who becomes a self-appointed private detective of sorts after his girlfriend falls victim to a jewelry robbery at a lavish museum opening. And with that, Charlie throws on his raincoat and fedora and sets off to find the culprits in a wonderfully stylized and humorous take on the point-and-click adventure.But what really sets Charlie apart from all the other amateur detectives out there is the heir's uncanny ability to revisit the various crime scenes in his own dreams, where he is able to find additional clues that are firmly planted in his subconscious mind. This whole dream-detective setup is clearly reflected in the first screenshot we've seen of the game, which features a cartoonish looking Charlie snooping around a warped and dreamlike office, with a wavering black-and-white tiled floor.Promising to offer lots of great humor and challenging puzzles, Dream Chamber is currently slated for release on October 24, 2013, and will be available on PC, Mac, and iPad platforms.
about 4 hours ago
Among Nintendo platformers, the established pecking order has long been Mario, then Kirby, with Donkey Kong County somewhere way down here. The series has its diehard fans, but the first game in particular has long been known at least a...
Among Nintendo platformers, the established pecking order has long been Mario, then Kirby, with Donkey Kong County somewhere way down here. The series has its diehard fans, but the first game in particular has long been known at least as much for recycling enemies and levels out the wazoo as for being a technical marvel circa 1994. In part because it traded so much on techncial novelty, Donkey Kong Country sort of faded into memory after 1996, until Retro Studios plucked it out of the dustbin of history and turned it into a viable franchise again. Now it has a talented development studio behind it, and more importantly, a real identity. That is to say, it's meant to be hard in a way that appeals to core gamers. Not that the Mario gamees are "easy" per se, but in Nintendo's mind, at least, it stands as the more family friendly series. Donkey Kong Country has been a difficult series pretty much from the beginning though, and so it's become the platformer that's not afraid to pull its punches. And with Tropical Freeze, the series' first foray on the Wii U, it embraces that identity wholeheartedly. But there were a couple other things that jumped out at me about Tropical Freeze as well. First, it moves way faster than its sibling New Super Mario Bros., in part because there's so much more happening in the levels themselves. In the best level of the bunch, a sea of flames in which everything in the jungle is catching fire and burning up, it's imperative that Donkey Kong and company keep moving, otherwise both the floor and the vines that DK needs to bridge various chasms will turn to a pile of burning ash, and he'll be trapped. Somewhere offscreen, I felt that there was this invisible force telling me: "Go, go, go." I love that sense of momentum in a platformer. The second thing that jumps out at me is how well-suited Tropical Freeze's co-op mechanics are to the pace and the action. This isn't any New Super Mario Bros., where four players ennd up consistently bumbling into one another. Subordinate skills nicely complement Donkey Kong's own moveset; so, for instance, if Dixie is on DK's back, she can use her helicopter ponytail to slow both their descents after a jump. She can also fire her bubblegum gun and stun enemies, and help propel him underwater. In fact, if she wants, she can simply let DK carry her to the level exit, which may be preferable for spouses and siblings who want to play, but can't keep up. If DK ends up plunging into an abyss by mistake though, that's two lives lost from the pool split by both players, so there's a tradeoff. The co-op multiplayer mostly builds on the legacy of the previous which can be said for much of the rest of the game as well. But the design feels that much sharper, and thanks to the Wii U's graphical capabilities, the scope is bigger as well. The aforementioned fire level is one instance of a stage that couldn't have been done on the Wii or the 3DS, or at least, it would have been more limited. Another example is the minecart stage, which was the bane of everyone's existence back in the days of the Super Nintendo. In Tropical Freeze, much of the minecart level makes use of a 3D camera, making it much easier to see and avoid obstacles. It's really amazing how the simple application of technology can make a lousy bit of rail jumping tolerable. In the meantime, Tropical Freeze also builds on the legacy of the previous games, while simultaneously burnishing its own credentials as a platformer for core gamers, in the way it handles collectibles. In addition to the usual "K-O-N-G" letters scattered throughout each level, there are puzzle pieces, which are frequently very difficult to reach. Most of the time, they lay near a collapsing bridge, or if it's a vehicle level, in a spot that you have to go out of your way to reach. Collecting them all is intended to be a major challenge. Interestingly, Tropical Freeze isn't all that big on exploration, though there are a few hidden ro
about 5 hours ago
Jane Jensen, creator of the original Gabriel Knight series from way back in the early 90s, has a pretty exciting announcement this week for fans of the classic line of point-and-click adventure games: her development studio Pinkerton Roa...
Jane Jensen, creator of the original Gabriel Knight series from way back in the early 90s, has a pretty exciting announcement this week for fans of the classic line of point-and-click adventure games: her development studio Pinkerton Road has officially acquired the Gabriel Knight licensing rights from Activision. And what do you think they've been doing with those newfound rights over the last year or so? Why, recreating the original Gabriel Knight adventure from scratch to commemorate the game's 20th anniversary!The Gabriel Knight saga follows the harrowing adventures of the titular bookstore owner and struggling novelist, as he makes his way through the voodoo-infested swamps and back alleys of New Orleans, and outwits the evil legion of shadow-hunters known as the Schattenj?gers. Set for release at some point midway in 2014, Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers is being completely reinvented from the ground up under Jensen's acute oversight, with full retina display visuals and new voice acting performances for when the game launches on PC, Mac, iPad and Android.This will be Jensen's first Gabriel Knight-related project since the creator left Sierra Online in 1999, and she couldn't be more excited about getting to revisit one of her most beloved creations in this manner: "I'm thrilled to be back at work on Gabriel Knight and to bring this classic game to a new generation of players," Jensen says. "It's going to look and feel like a brand new title. But never fear, 100% of the original Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers is here. I hope both existing fans and new players will love it."Any long-time Gabriel Knight fans out there who are overjoyed by this news? Any newcomers who can't wait to be introduced to this true classic point-and-click adventure for the first time? Be sure to let us know your thoughts in the replies, and check out the upcoming remake's official website for more Gabriel Knight goodness!
about 5 hours ago
Less than a year ago, The Last Door surpassed its humble Kickstarter goal of ?3,852. The crowdfunding pitch promised a heavily pixelated horror experience set against an enthralling, orchestral soundtrack. The series would be episodic,...
Less than a year ago, The Last Door surpassed its humble Kickstarter goal of ?3,852. The crowdfunding pitch promised a heavily pixelated horror experience set against an enthralling, orchestral soundtrack. The series would be episodic, with each new entry coming to life only if the community willed and made it happen. With the third chapter, The Four Witnesses, having just reached its funding target, the community has spoken: we're not ready to close the door. We talked with The Game Kitchen's Community and PR Manager Ra?l D?ez about crowdfunding, crowd support, and the challenges and joys of maintaining an episodic game series that, thankfully, shows no sign of ending any time soon. A funding update as seen on thelastdoor.com While a successful indie game campaign is not an uncommon event these days, The Game Kitchen had a unique, elongated approach to crowdfunding from the get-go. Kickstarter was only the (critical) beginning, funding the pilot chapter in what would hopefully become an ongoing web series. Backers on Kickstarter earned early access to this pilot, and backers who pledged 10 pounds or higher became "premium members" for life. "They are VIP members since they trusted us from the very beginning," D?ez told Gamezebo, "and they tend to be the most active community members...Our premium members (who have pledged any amount over EUR15 in any of our crowdfunding campaigns for any chapter) get free access to all past and future chapters, forever, in addition to early access to beta versions and other rewards attached." This makes The Last Door the game that keeps on giving to its backers, so long as new chapters continue to be released.Those new chapters rely on the community's support in multiple ways, starting with funding. Since the Kickstarter campaign only covered the pilot chapter, subsequent entries in the series need to be backed directly for a reasonable EUR10,000. Once this goal is reached, the next chapter's development is guaranteed and the previous chapter will become free upon its release. Regarding making the games free, D?ez said: "It's part of our funding model and matches our personal values, too. By making the chapters available for free (except the newest), we allow people to get to know our game and to check it for free beforehand (with no risk of paying for something that you may end up not liking). Thus, if you love it and want to keep on playing, you only have to donate 'what you want' to access the current chapter and help us in the development of the following installment." The Last Door Trailer Contributors are also encouraged to provide feedback on chapters and even content, creating a dynamic loop between developers and players. "Keep in mind that we launched The Last Door project in Kickstarter," D?ez said. "So since the beginning, the community is of vital importance. We were crystal clear that we wanted to build a large and involved community. And to get them involved, you have to make them participate--which is easy because people love to take part in creative projects. On top of that, it matches our personal values since we believe in collaboration as a way of creation."One of these collaborations is the callout for in-game descriptions written by community members. "The 'Leave Your Mark' initiative, this is to say, the player-written descriptions, has been one of the most patent actions of collaboration we have done so far, and we are running it again for this third episode," D?ez said. "I have to say that it's been highly successful, but it is not the only process we put in the hands of our community members. For instance, we have set up a system that allows community localizations and because of that, currently we already have the first chapter available in 17 different languages."In addition, the community helps us test the game; they are ... (Read More)
about 5 hours ago
A Wikipedia network associated with the account, Morning277, is made up of paid editors who were hired by small Silicon Valley companies to create pages for them. The account has made more than 6,000 edits since 2008. Hundreds of pages c...
A Wikipedia network associated with the account, Morning277, is made up of paid editors who were hired by small Silicon Valley companies to create pages for them. The account has made more than 6,000 edits since 2008. Hundreds of pages connected to the network have disappeared and many involve the company, Wiki-PR. Wiki-PR warns potential clients, “Don’t get caught in a PR debacle editing your own page,” and offers to generate articles about clients who don’t meet Wikipedia’s “notability” standard. “Whatever your opinion on paid editors, Morning277’s actions did not meet even a minimum level of disclosure,” writes The Daily Dot’s Simon Owens. Owens points to Wiki-PR’s claim to employ Wikipedia admins. If true, this could mean Wikipedia power users are involved in sockpuppetry—the creation of online personae to purposefully disguise one’s identity—and that “sleeper agents” exist among the Wikipedia elite. An investigation was prompted when Wikipedia editor, DocTree, reviewing a page for UK digital encryption company, CyberSafe, discovered the page’s sources dealt with Internet security in general, but not CyberSafe. “It was all smoke and mirrors,” DocTree told Owens. Most pages in the Morning277 network are positive and promotional in nature. Previous reports, however, point to evidence of sexist and revenge editing to Wikipedia pages. In May, Salon’s Andrew Leonard outed Wikipedia editor “Quorty” for a series of revenge edits to a Wikipedia page about late writer Barry Hannah. Qworty had made more than 13,000 edits—trying to hide his true identity while destructively editing the pages of other writers and making numerous edits to his own page (Bob Young). Owens asked DocTree if the current investigation had effectively wiped out most of the undisclosed, conflicted edits on the site. DocTree responded, “It’s just the tip of the iceberg. New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 7 hours ago
Image via 101XP Avataria developer 101XP has released its newest title on Facebook, a naval combat game called Admiral. The game sees players building and commanding a fleet of ships in their own naval shipyard, and then taking those shi...
Image via 101XP Avataria developer 101XP has released its newest title on Facebook, a naval combat game called Admiral. The game sees players building and commanding a fleet of ships in their own naval shipyard, and then taking those ships into battle against computer and player-controlled enemy units. After the game’s tutorial, players will be in command of four small ships, and will need to balance the use of multiple resources to keep those ships in top operational shape, while also keeping enough supplies on hand to build new vessels. Players must collect fuel, coins, iron and more, with each being produced in buildings within the shipyard, or being available to earn out at sea or through quests. Image via 101XP Sea battles turn the game into something resembling the classic board game Battleship. Players can arrange their units on a grid, and opponents will do the same. Play becomes turn-based, as each user takes turns firing a shot at one individual square on the grid. The location of enemy ships is a mystery, but players have access to tools like mines and sonar that may identify their location without wasting shots. In between battles, players can complete quests and will unlock new ships that require greater resources to construct. For social play, users can visit their friends’ shipyards, inspecting their ships for rewards, and also enter into friendly multiplayer matches that won’t cause any permanent damage to their ships. Admiral currently has 145,000 monthly active players, according to AppData, our tracking service for social and mobile apps and developers. It’s now available to play for free on Facebook.
about 8 hours ago