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Eat better to improve recovery? To boost energy? To cut soreness? To improve strength? To reduce inflammation? To reinforce immune protection? You bet! In this article, Kurtis Frank (one of the brilliant minds behind Examine.com – the we...
Eat better to improve recovery? To boost energy? To cut soreness? To improve strength? To reduce inflammation? To reinforce immune protection? You bet! In this article, Kurtis Frank (one of the brilliant minds behind Examine.com – the web’s most impressive compendium of independent research on supplements and nutrition) helps troubleshoot the most common recovery problems. Introduction Think back to the last time you felt at the top of your game – physically and mentally at your very best, enjoying peak performance. If you imagined your eighth grade field day, your recovery strategy might need some help. (For more about recovery, see All About Recovery.) The training – recovery cycle If we want to get fitter and stronger, we need to train hard enough to get our body’s attention — to temporarily and slightly exceed our body’s capacity. Only with intense training does the body grow stronger. But training itself doesn’t make the magic. The rest between training periods is what actually improves our fitness. Only while we rest can our body adapt to compensate for the stress we’ve put on it. In other words, recover. Recovery is what enables fitness and strength. Thus, training and rest-recovery periods are complementary. You need both. The better your recovery, the more frequently and more intensely you can train.  Your body’s bank account Think of training like making withdrawals from a “body bank account”. The more intense the training, the bigger the withdrawal. Training stress can also combine with other life stressors — such as work, relationships, family, financial or other demands. Rest and recovery is a deposit into that bank account. And hopefully, you’re putting in a good — and regular — salary of purposeful rest and recovery protocols. Otherwise, you risk overtraining and over-reaching, i.e. “deficit spending”. Overtraining & over-reaching When we ignore our need for rest and recovery, we run the risk of overtraining or over-reaching. Our body’s “bank account” goes into debt… or worse, total bankruptcy. The symptoms look the same, and differ mostly by degree. Overtraining is the most serious version of this “body debt”, and it happens often to bodybuilders and other athletes who reduce their calories too drastically while training heavily and frequently. Overtraining can involve: serious loss of strength and fitness significant and chronic joint and muscle pain serious changes in mood, such as major depression or other psychiatric issues significant sleep disruption major immunity problems — frequent and serious illnesses (e.g. bacterial/viral infections, etc.) hormonal suppression (e.g. low thyroid, low sex hormones, amenorrhea or irregular periods in women, etc.) Over-reaching — the milder version of overtraining — is a far more common and insidious problem for recreational exercisers. Over-reaching can involve: low energy and mojo persistently “meh” workouts; not really feeling into training feeling sore and achey all the time feeling mildly irritable, moody, or anxious minor, nagging injuries not feeling 100% — catching minor bugs, feeling run-down Basically, in both cases, you feel like crap. Supplementation: First steps Step 1: Pay attention Symptoms sound familiar? That’s okay. Awareness is the first step in targeting the problem. Consider a symptom diary where you track how you feel — even a few notes in the margin of your workout journal can help you see trends. Step 2: Do the basics, consistently The second step is to immediately reinforce your existing good habits. This includes: getting enough quality sleep getting enough quality nutrients actively chasing rest and recovery protocols Usually, following this “fundamentals first” prescription for a few days – and then committing to maintaining it – will improve your symptoms. Re
about 5 hours ago
DAY IN THE LIFE: How Bobby Holland Hanton Stays In Shape As A Stunt Double For Chris Hemsworth
DAY IN THE LIFE: How Bobby Holland Hanton Stays In Shape As A Stunt Double For Chris Hemsworth
about 17 hours ago
HMB Overview An active metabolite of leucine with strong anti-catabolic effects. Subject of a recent review by the JISSN HMB appears to be a safe an effective way to slow and prevent muscle protein breakdown and reduce the effects on per...
HMB Overview An active metabolite of leucine with strong anti-catabolic effects. Subject of a recent review by the JISSN HMB appears to be a safe an effective way to slow and prevent muscle protein breakdown and reduce the effects on performance of over training and over reaching. HMB has been on the sports supplement scene for a long time now with early research starting in late 1996. Studies have shown mixed results but the totality of evidence combined with it’s good safety record and low dosing requirements make it an interesting option to consider for enhancing athletic performance. See also recent presentation showing some smaller trials on strength training athletes. Potential Benefits Anti-catabolic Enhanced performance in over reaching training situations Possible protein synthesis potential Possible anti-inflammatory and health benefit Low effective dose makes this an easy protocol to introduce Potential Adverse Effects No adverse effects have been reported in the studies I looked at. HMB tastes really bad as a powder, so add flavoring or use capsules. Excessive dosages probably cause GI distress as per other aminos. Summary and Recommendations Dosages used in the studies are normally 3grams daily. However a better dosing schedule would be to take 38mg/kg. Most benefits are seen in recent studies when the dose is taken before exercise. PAPERS AND REFERENCES http://examine.com/supplements/HMB/ – overview http://www.jissn.com/content/10/1/6 JISSN position stand http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23908318 attenuates immune response to intense exercise http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23514626 – anti-catabolic response to bed rest http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23085015 – role in anti-ageing sarcopenia http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22075640 – fatigue resistance (rat study) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21807930 additive effects with ARG/LYS and vitD http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20857835 – pathways and effects discussion http://suppversity.blogspot.co.uk/search?q=HMB – good background read Wilson GJ, Wilson JM, Manninen AH. (2008). “Effects of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) on exercise performance and body composition across varying levels of age, sex, and training experience: A review.”.Nutrition & Metabolism5: http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/1 – read it here
2 days ago
A study at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota, shows that the use of the dietary supplement PhosphatidylSerine (PS) has a positive effect on muscular stress following moderate aerobic exercise by trained runners. “It ...
A study at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota, shows that the use of the dietary supplement PhosphatidylSerine (PS) has a positive effect on muscular stress following moderate aerobic exercise by trained runners. “It is generally accepted that creatine kinase is an indicator of cell membrane damage and necrosis of the muscle fibers,” says John Seifert, a principal investigator at St. Cloud. “Our work shows that PS supplementation results in significantly lower amounts of creatine kinase (CK) levels 24 hours after exercise. This implies that PS can help minimize muscle fiber damage caused by muscular stress.” Another study gave Phosphatidylserine supplements to football players and discovered that the supplement gave them more stamina. What’s more, the supplement improved their sprint speed. When cyclists where given a daily dose of 750 mg Phosphatidylserine derived from soya for a period of ten days, the same effect was observed. He also discovered that the supplementation enabled the athletes to maintain an exertion level of 85 percent of their VO2max for 30 percent longer. Look for Phosphatidylserine in BioRhythm’s AfterGlow and Intek’s Post Workout formula. A study at St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota, shows that the use of the dietary supplement PhosphatidylSerine (PS) has a positive effect on muscular stress following moderate aerobic exercise by trained runners. “It is generally accepted that creatine kinase is an indicator of cell membrane damage and necrosis of the muscle fibers,” says John Seifert, a principal investigator at St. Cloud. “Our work shows that PS supplementation results in significantly lower amounts of creatine kinase (CK) levels 24 hours after exercise. This implies that PS can help minimize muscle fiber damage caused by muscular stress.” Another study gave Phosphatidylserine supplements to football players and discovered that the supplement gave them more stamina. What’s more, the supplement improved their sprint speed. When cyclists where given a daily dose of 750 mg Phosphatidylserine derived from soya for a period of ten days, the same effect was observed.  He also discovered that the supplementation enabled the athletes to maintain an exertion level of 85 percent of their VO2max for 30 percent longer. Look for Phosphatidylserine in BioRhythm’s AfterGlow and Intek’s Post Workout formula. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE DefSemiHidden="true" DefQFormat="false" DefPriority="99" LatentStyleCount="267"> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Normal"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="heading 1"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Title"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtitle"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Strong"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Emphasis"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Table Grid"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="No Spacing"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Shading"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light List"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Light Grid"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 1"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Shading 2"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 1"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium List 2"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 1"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 2"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Medium Grid 3"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Dark List"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Shading"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful List"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" Name="Colorful Grid"/> UnhideWhenUsed="false" N
3 days ago
This is the second in the series of articles on how to improve your sexual function and boost your testosterone levels. The first article is here in case you missed it    As we all know, sex isn’t only about blood flow to the extremities...
This is the second in the series of articles on how to improve your sexual function and boost your testosterone levels. The first article is here in case you missed it    As we all know, sex isn’t only about blood flow to the extremities. Raging hormones are the main culprits behind our lusty desires, and a reduction in hormonal activity reduces sex drive. However, we can eat to support hormone synthesis in the body. The main hormone for sex drive, in both males and females, is testosterone. This hormone needs zinc for proper production, which is available in many tasty and nutritious foods. It’s no coincidence many traditional aphrodisiac foods are high in this mineral… INCREASE; Zinc rich foods Ever wonder why Casanova used to eat oysters by the dozen?  Zinc is sometimes referred to as the male mineral and is required for growth, healing and testosterone production. Oysters contain the highest level of zinc in any food and pumpkin seeds are also particularly high. Other good choices include: Ginger root, lamb chops, split peas, brazil nuts, soy lecithin, black pepper, paprika, mustard, chilli, thyme, cinnamon, sardines, almonds, walnuts, rye, oats, tuna, anchovies, and haddock. Don’t consume too much zinc keep to 20-30 mg a day maximum. So if you are having a zinc containing multi vitamin like ZMA then be careful to total up your zinc from all sources.   INCREASE; good fats and healthy cholesterol; Nuts such as Brazil nuts and oils such as flax seed oil are good when taken 1st thing in the morning and last thing at night. I also have noticed increased arousal after eating omelettes, particularly shortly after weight training in the morning. This may be due to the increased cholesterol providing a building block for all sex hormones.  There is also a link between increased animal protein ingestion and higher testosterone levels.  Other beneficial foods to eat around the training window before and after or taken 1st thing in the morning or later at night include; prawns, pork loin, grass fed beef, eggs – including yolks, and the nuts and oils listed above.  Cholesterol is best when it’s not overly cooked – as this oxidizes and makes it less healthy for the body to deal with. Keeping egg yolks runny and not over cooking foods is one way to avoid this.   DEFICIENCIES Deficiencies in any vitamin, mineral or essential fat will lower potential optimal testosterone production. The items listed above contain good levels of minerals, essential fats and vitamins A and D – all are required for optimal testosterone production.  My own research has shown sub optimal deficiencies in vitamin D  are very common affecting up to 70% of the athletic population; these guys are the ones who are supposed to be eating properly. Vitamin A is less commonly deficient but also worth addressing if optimal T levels are what you want and can be an issue more frequently than people currently think.  For testosterone production you need pure vitamin A not the beta carotene pre cursor which isn’t really vitamin A at all but a different and very healthy molecule in its own right. Be careful when supplementing with retinol and also eating vitamin A rich foods. I’d  prefer you  to keep to a beta carotene rich supplement from mixed carotenoids and then eat plentiful vitamin A foods from your diet. Eggs, liver, milk and meat are the best sources. Don’t take too much of vitamin A, or eat liver if you are thinking of becoming pregnant as it may harm your baby. Eat regularly  This will help to lower a protein called sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). This protein locks up sex hormones and lowers ‘free’ levels of these hormones like free testosterone. Keeping to regular smaller meals also helps lower body fat stores another factor in increasing estrogen and insulin levels. There is a lot to take in and consider in these areas and this is where it is often worth investing in a consultation with a nutritionist if you need particular support in this area.
5 days ago
I’ve met a fair number of successful, self-made people in my life. They all work in different industries, and came from different backgrounds and walks of life. The one thing they all have in common? They all work hard. And they all work...
I’ve met a fair number of successful, self-made people in my life. They all work in different industries, and came from different backgrounds and walks of life. The one thing they all have in common? They all work hard. And they all work a LOT. In my opinion success has always been about doing work. The old ‘right place, right time’ is what jealous people say about successful people – I know this because I’m guilty of using this excuse in the past. Yes, many successful people did catch an awesome ‘once in a life time’ break at one point in their lives, but when that opportunity came about, they were ready, because they were working, and once they said ‘yes’ to that opportunity, they worked even harder. The same goes for the people I know who have built incredible bodies. They used different workout routines and different diets, but each and every one of them were ‘nose-to-the-grindstone, get-it-done’ kind of people. Yes, some had great genetics to start, some used steroids, but all of them, ALL of them did work, And lots of it. Despite what the latest ‘make money quick’, or ‘get jacked’ fads may promise, there is simply no substitute for hard work. And this is where I would like to draw the analogy between business success and building muscle. It is similar to the analogy between body fat and debt. Basically, the same principles that create successful entrepreneurs also create people who are successful at changing their bodies. The first Principle - Successful people do work. Successful people work hard. Yes, we can argue quality over quantity, and doing the ‘right type’ of work, but all things being equal, more work is generally better than less. And yes, I know the trend right now in business and weight training is to talk about doing less work, but let’s face it – it takes a lot of hard work to get to the point where you can preach to people about doing less work. The true visionaries, people like Elon Musk and Richard Branson – they are committed to consistently out-working their competitors. They do more work, more of the ‘right kind of work’ and more ‘quality work’. They do more everything. But they also try and do ‘less’ work. The trick is that they have a very unique way of doing ‘less work’ – I would say they redefine what ‘work’ means. You have to make work fun, if you can do that it’s ceases to fell like work, it just becomes what you do, simply because you feel fulfilled and satisfied doing it. Most successful people don’t work for an hour then take 4 days off. They don’t work a little bit. They never stop working, because they enjoy it. But, it’s not work to them in the classic sense since they are doing something they love, and they are careful to also enjoy life. As much as you may hate to hear it, the same goes for building a great body. It takes a commitment to doing work and a lot of it. You’ll always see marketing claims about the people who supposedly built great bodies on 20 minutes of exercise once a week, because quick results with minimal work will always be an attractive sales pitch. but as a general rule, great bodies take work.  So to be able to consistently do a lot of work, it must be something you love doing. Which brings me to the Second Principle – You must love what you do if you’re going to be successful Stop looking at what other people are doing. Stop cheating off someone else’s paper and write your own paper. If you’re going to commit to doing a lot of work, it has to be something you love. I have a friend who makes a living owning a fight-wear company, and another who makes a living as a trader. They’re both successful because they’re working hard at something they love to do. I doubt they’d have the same success if they switched jobs.  The same principle works for building your body. If you love lifting weights then lift weights. If you love Kettlebells then swing your bells. If you love Crossfit then do Crossfit, who cares what o
5 days ago
Little bit of a shot at Canada here at the end --> For Scientists in a Democracy, to dissent is to be reasonable:
Little bit of a shot at Canada here at the end --> For Scientists in a Democracy, to dissent is to be reasonable:
6 days ago
Too much stress, or the wrong kind, can harm our health. Yet stress can also be a positive force in our lives, keeping us focused, alert, and at the top of our game. It all depends what kind of stress it is, how prepared we are to meet i...
Too much stress, or the wrong kind, can harm our health. Yet stress can also be a positive force in our lives, keeping us focused, alert, and at the top of our game. It all depends what kind of stress it is, how prepared we are to meet it — and how we view it. +++ People often think of stress as a dangerous and deadly thing. Yet stress is simply a normal physiological response to events that make you feel threatened or upset your equilibrium in some way. When you sense danger — physical, mental or emotional — your defenses kick into high gear in a rapid, automatic process known as the “fight or flight” response, aka the stress response. The stress response is your body’s way of protecting you. When working properly, the stress response helps you stay focused, energetic and alert. In emergency situations, stress can save your life or that of others — giving you the extra strength to lift a car off your child, or spurring you to slam the brakes to avoid an accident. The stress response also helps you rise to meet challenges. Stress keeps you sharp during a presentation at work, increases your concentration when you need it most, or drives you to study for an exam when you’d rather be out with your friends. But beyond a certain point, stress stops helping and starts damaging your health, your mood, your productivity, your relationships, and your quality of life. Stress and the allostatic load Grab a piece of paper and write down all the things in your average day that could possibly be a stress on your body, mind, and emotions. We’d guess your list probably looks something like this: Boss yelled at me Rushing around to see clients Worrying about money Commuting Crummy weather Kid woke me up early Girlfriend/boyfriend snarked at me this morning I think I might’ve eaten some bad shrimp salad If you’re like most people, you’re a camel carrying a big load of straw with these combined life stresses. Now imagine what could happen if you start piling on more straw with worrying about your body image, with physical stress from your workouts, or with restricting your food intake. Eventually… snap. The pile of straw — the cumulative total of all the stuff in your life that causes physical, mental, and/or emotional stress — is known as your allostatic load. Good stress, bad stress Some stress is good stress (also called eustress). Good stress pushes you out of your comfort zone, but in a good way. Good stress helps you learn, grow, and get stronger. For example, riding a roller coaster is fun and exciting. It lasts a short time, and you feel exhilarated afterwards. (That is, if you like roller coasters.) Exercise can be another form of good stress. You feel a little uncomfortable but then you feel good, and after an hour or so, you’re done. Good stress: is short-lived is infrequent is over quickly (in a matter of minutes or hours) can be part of a positive life experience inspires you to action helps build you up — it leaves you better than you were before. But let’s say you ride that roller coaster constantly, or lift weights 4 hours a day, every day. Now it doesn’t seem so fun, does it? This is bad stress, or distress. Bad stress: lasts a long time is chronic is ongoing is negative, depressing, and demoralizing de-motivates and paralyzes you breaks you down — it leaves you worse off than you were before. One key feature that distinguishes good from bad stress is how well the stressor matches your ability to recover from it. The stress “sweet spot” Since stress affects the mind, body, and behavior in many ways, everyone experiences stress differently. Each of us has a unique “recovery zone”, whether that’s physical or psychological, and our recovery zone depends on several factors. Just as important as the stress itself is how you perceive and respond to it. Some people go with the flow and can adapt well to what others would perceive as highly stressful events. Other people crumble at even the slightest challenge or frustrati
7 days ago
What you see to your left is called a BlenderBottle GoStak. Now, if you’re already familiar with the BlenderBottle (and more specifically, the BlenderBall inside,) this is going to seem like a totally different type of product off...
What you see to your left is called a BlenderBottle GoStak. Now, if you’re already familiar with the BlenderBottle (and more specifically, the BlenderBall inside,) this is going to seem like a totally different type of product offering. It’s a system of interlocking jars designed to carry protein powders, vitamins, and snacks on the go. So, no blending is involved, but it is a perfect complement to the BlenderBottle SportMixer. Two reasons. First, you can carry pre-measured ingredients that are then combined inside a BlenderBottle when it’s time to mix up your drink. Second, the GoStak fits neatly inside an empty blender bottle for compact transport and storage. Both have carry loops, so either can be attached to a backpack with a carabiner (as pictured in my BlenderBottle SportMixer review.) Or carry it with just one finger. Your choice. In the past, I was never really into this type of stuff. I just used little baggies or some Zip-loc containers. But after getting a JerseyBin, it opened my eyes. You can get reusable containers that are much more durable than little baggies. They’re not that expensive, and they’re better for the environment since there’s less waste. Look at this comparison. You can see how the GoStak is neat and tidy! And in the case of powders, gels, or liquids you might want to carry, the GoStak won’t blow out and spill. In my photo, from top to bottom, it’s filled with: Greens Plus powder TrueNutrition whey protein powder Trail mix Dried fruit So I’m all set with veggies, protein, and some high-carb snacks to fuel my adventures. What all could you carry in it? This article on the BlenderBottle blog will give you even more ideas on what you can carry. If you’re an endurance athlete, here are some of my ideas on what you could take with you: protein powder flax meal, oat flour, etc. drink mixes like Hammer Perpetuem Greens Plus multivitamins, fish oil, and other pills mixed nuts and trail mix candy like gum drops dog treats Dog treats? If you have a dog that’s going trail running or mountain biking with you, definitely carry some dog treats – preferably in one of the larger size bottle segments. If your dog is the size of Max (where the GoStak is literally the size of his body,) you could get away with using the smallest size segment! Who is the GoStak ideal for? It’s totally awesome for high-school and college students who go from class to practice or from class to work to the gym. It will keep everything organized, and it will hold up to abuse, day after day. Just refill it each morning. And for cyclists, it’s specifically nice for big endurance events. I’m talking MTB stage racing and 24-hour solo races. You want to have everything partitioned out and ready to go in advance. You don’t want to be fumbling with scoops and big containers, spilling stuff (and getting dirt in the main container,) and trying to figure out what is where, when you need to focus on the race at hand. And it would make a great gift for these people! My final verdict is… They call it “a revolutionary advancement in portable nutrition.” While I’d agree the Blender Ball deserves that level of praise, I’m just going to say that the GoStak is pretty neat. It’s definitely made well and does what they claim, but if you’re not sure what you’d use it for, don’t buy it. On the other hand, if you are in a situation where you need to carry specific, pre-measured ingredients, the GoStak is a very handy little accessory! Official website: www.BlenderBottle.com Buy online: www.Amazon.com Product Review Details Company: BlenderBottle. Product: BlenderBottle GoStak Reviewed by: Coach Levi My Rating: 4.0 out of 5 Date last updated: 2013-10-01 Obtained Product: Free sample from company. CoachLevi.com Advertiser: No. Click here if you would like to get your product reviewed o
8 days ago
Overview Magnesium is the second most prevalent dietary deficiency in the world ( Vitamin D is no.1). This is probably due to farming methods depleting magnesium from the soil combined with  low dietary intake levels. Whilst magnesiu...
Overview Magnesium is the second most prevalent dietary deficiency in the world ( Vitamin D is no.1). This is probably due to farming methods depleting magnesium from the soil combined with  low dietary intake levels. Whilst magnesium is not an ergogenic aid (performance improving), correcting and guarding against deficiencies in athletes should assist performance on a number of levels. Magnesium has roles to play in muscle relaxation, anti-excitability, insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism, reducing blood pressure and over 350 enzyme reactions in the body are dependent on magnesium. Magnesium’s role in preventing cramps has not been well established in the literature despite frequent anecdotal reports to the contrary. “Some of the processes in which magnesium is a cofactor include, but are not limited to, protein synthesis, cellular energy production and storage, reproduction, DNA and RNA synthesis, and stabilizing mitochondrial membranes. Magnesium also plays a critical role in nerve transmission, cardiac excitability, neuromuscular conduction, muscular contraction, vasomotor tone, blood pressure, and glucose and insulin metabolism. Because of magnesium’s many functions within the body, it plays a major role in disease prevention and overall health. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases including migraine headaches, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular accident (stroke), hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Good food sources of magnesium include unrefined (whole) grains, spinach, nuts, legumes, and sweet and white potatoes (tubers)”.   Potential Benefits Correcting a deficiency should result in better glucose regulation, lower blood pressure and less excitability and possibly anxiety. Anecdotally people report better sleep when taking magnesium acutely towards bedtime. More benefits will be noticed by individuals who are deficient than those who eat a magnesium plentiful diet. Deficiency may be associated with development of OTS   Potential Adverse Effects Excess amounts may cause GI distress. All minerals compete for absorption if high dose magnesium is taken a broad-spectrum multi mineral formula is advised. Summary and Recommendations Magnesium supplementation is used currently for assisting sleep and relaxation. No studies really support this in individuals with good levels of magnesium. Magnesium levels in athletes are often low when measured in the erythrocyte.   Magnesium should be measured in the erythrocyte and dietary or supplemental magnesium provided in an individual basis. PAPERS AND REFERENCES http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23247672 – over training syndrome http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23031849 – higher intake less bowel cancer http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22972143 – review on role in cramping http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22907037 – cardiovascular health http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21983266 – some associations with strength http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20352370 – raises testosterone levels http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18705536 – immune function and low levels http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17999037 – may increase cortisol with exhaustion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17625241 – positive effects
11 days ago