Supernanny

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Date: Sep 11th 2013 6:16p.m. Contributed by: geofferson OK, so our track record with these casting calls hasn't been great--we don't really know what's happened to The Real...
Date: Sep 11th 2013 6:16p.m. Contributed by: geofferson OK, so our track record with these casting calls hasn't been great--we don't really know what's happened to The Real Brits of Shanghai and the CCTV version of Supernanny (though we hear the latter is still on). But here's a new one from our friend Andy Curtain, one of the comedians behind Kung Fu Komedy. The International Channel Shanghai (ICS) - Shanghai's English-language cable channel - is creating a new comedy television program, based on current events. The station is searching for a female co-host to lead the weekly feature-program. Candidates should speak English natively, or near enough. We are looking for someone energetic and fun on camera. Experience in television or performance is a plus. Yeah, so experience is a "plus," not a requirement, and as far as we've been told these castings will not happen on Andy's grotty couch. If you're interested, drop him a line.
about 9 hours ago
And Then Emily Was Gone. John Lees, Iain Laurie. I reckon the cover here does a fine job; something weird, dark, nasty hunting people down. Or maybe that’s just what Lees and Laurie want us to think? Whatever, it’s a damn fi...
And Then Emily Was Gone. John Lees, Iain Laurie. I reckon the cover here does a fine job; something weird, dark, nasty hunting people down. Or maybe that’s just what Lees and Laurie want us to think? Whatever, it’s a damn fine intro to the dark and mysterious tale of what happened to Emily Munro. This dark little tale begins with Greg Hellinger.  Hellinger’s got a rep as a famous cop, capable of finding the unfindable. But that rep’s a long time gone. Now he’s an ex-cop, hallucinating monsters all the time, after what his bosses described as a ‘spectacular mental breakdown’, he’s almost incapable of sleeping properly, he lives in squalor, looks like shit, hates himself, hates his life. You can see why … Enter 17-year old Fiona, who wants Hellinger for a case. Not because he was a cop, but because he can find things, and because he knows about monsters. She’s got a missing persons case for him, and it may well involve a peculiar Scottish folk tale beastie, who may well have taken her best friend. Fiona and Emily were inseparable, loners bound together on Merksay, of of the isles of Orkney, and shared everything in a wonderful, isolated yet happy life. Until Emily reckoned she saw Bonnie Shaw… (Sort of a Scots fairy-tale version of Supernanny then.) A terrified Emily plans to be away from the island, and Fiona planned to go with her, except when the moment came…. no Emily. Not been seen since. Clever Fiona’s not convinced by the police version of events, she knows Emily wouldn’t leave without her, and anyway, there’s another 11 unaccounted ‘runaways’ in the last 20 years that she’s uncovered. With a strength and bravery we’ll no doubt uncover more of later on, she returns to Merksay, with her monster finding ex-cop in tow. Except what if the monsters are less mysterious and folk-tale and more human, and even more dangerous? That’s certainly the direction Lee and Laurie seem to be taking us here, as alongside the tale of Emily, Fiona, and Hellinger, we meet Vin with his best friend Louise, and discover that Vin has a brutal and bloody job doing brutal and bloody things to unfortunate souls, … and then there’s the box. The mysterious box. The dangerous box, owned by a man losing his mind, and a family whose little girl looks very much like a younger Emily. So, as a first issue this really does tick all those important boxes… not too obvious, the necessary setup balanced with enough mystery to keep it all interesting, yet not too obtuse to make it frustrating. The characters are gathered, a mix of weird and damaged, and everything is poised really well for the second episode. Most importantly, you get to the final page and wonder just when you’ll be able to read issue 2. That’s always a good sign. And artistically it’s a real surprise. I looked at the cover and the first couple of pages and reckoned it was another one of Iain Laurie’s collections of grotesque lines (and yes, that’s a compliment – it’s all in the way he puts those grotesque lines together after all). Except within a few pages it softens, until we get to page 7 and get something that’s much gentler, with a rounded, quaint sort of style, all the usual darkness stripped out, leaving something really solid, and dammit, rather beautiful and sweet…. Beautiful and sweet. Not a phrase I’d ever imagined I’d be using to describe Laurie’s work. But dammit, he goes and does it again a few pages later… Okay, so not sweet, but oh my, certainly beautiful in the sadness that Fiona’s face and body language projects to the reader. That aspect of Laurie’s art was completely new to me. I shouldn’t be surprised, it’s very unlikely anyone of his talent would be incapable of switching styles and moods, but what I’ve seen of his work in rec
22 days ago
Date: Jul 18th 2013 4:23p.m. Contributed by: geofferson Hey, remember that time we told all you limeys to audition for The Real Brits of Shanghai? Well ... we don't really ...
Date: Jul 18th 2013 4:23p.m. Contributed by: geofferson Hey, remember that time we told all you limeys to audition for The Real Brits of Shanghai? Well ... we don't really know what happened to that. But hey, here's a new reality show that's recruiting "talent," and this time it's for a CCTV-2 show. From the press release: This critically acclaimed series offers a reality "twist" on parenting programmes. Families in crisis appeal to SUPERNANNY - a real life no nonsense Mary Poppins who uses her years of experience to turn out of control monsters into perfect angels - all in just three weeks. SUPERNANNY sucessfully blends a direct and honest approach to parenting, with good old-fashioned discipline, imaginative techniques and bucket loads of emotional content. She marches in to help harassed parents deal with the most extreme of parenting nightmares and her traditional, no-nonsense approach soon gets the most wilful and destructive of children in order. It looks like they're in some sort of partnership with the Supernanny show that aired for seven seasons in the West and even spawned a spin-off book. They just started casting yesterday, and their ideal candidates are a mixed family with one Chinese (local) parent. If you're interested in having your life put on CCTV's for (literally) a billion people to see, email Ashlee.
about 1 month ago