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This tea from Good Green Tea has been an Autumn staple over the last few years. To read more about the traditional and all natural process that this tea goes through please see these posts here and here. On this fall day the water boil...
This tea from Good Green Tea has been an Autumn staple over the last few years. To read more about the traditional and all natural process that this tea goes through please see these posts here and here. On this fall day the water boils...The first infusion delivers a fine apricot sweetness followed up by a cinnamon-persimmon taste which lingers in the mouth. This first infusion is light, sweet, clean, and fruity. It has a lingering aftertaste of spicy, vibrant apricot pie. MMMmmm... The qi is nice and warming in the body, flushing the face slightly and imparting a subtle warm lightness in the body. The second infusion is full of warm, sweet tastes. Apricots approach first then a nice sweet woody taste is explored. The mouthfeel is watery and a bit fuzzy on the tongue. It creates a light stimulation on the cheeks and at the back of the throat.The third infusion has a sweet pumpkin-spice taste with a distinct undercurrent of sweet milky-bready coco. The taste is expansive and yummy. There are many nuances to the flavour in this infusion all within a stereotypcially soft balhyocaha mouthfeel.The fourth is a sweet, fruity, woody affair with a subtle coco aftertaste on the breathe. The mouthfeel is stronger on the tongue now but still quite soft.Currently one is on the fifth infusion and things are still quite enjoyable.Peace
about 4 hours ago
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Green Where to Buy:  Culinary Teas Tea Description: During the manufacturing process jasmine flowers are layered between the green tea leaves. The fragrant flowers impart an ethereal floral character to this ...
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Green Where to Buy:  Culinary Teas Tea Description: During the manufacturing process jasmine flowers are layered between the green tea leaves. The fragrant flowers impart an ethereal floral character to this Chinese tea.  Learn more about this tea here. Taster’s Review: As the regular readers of this blog are probably well aware, jasmine tea is one of my favorites.  I love the beautiful fragrance of jasmine, and I love the gentle floral flavor that jasmine flowers impart onto green tea.  It’s a tea that I like to sip on daily, because it’s so uplifting.  It’s my go-to tea when I’m preparing dinner. Here’s the problem … Jasmine Pearls are not inexpensive.  And yes, I do love my jasmine pearls, but, they are not something that I can drink every day.  I usually save the Jasmine Pearls for a special occasion, and for my daily tea consumption, I usually turn to a more affordable option, like this this Jasmine with Flowers Green Tea from Culinary Teas. And this is a really lovely cuppa!  The green tea is sweet and vegetative with a flavor that is slightly grassy, but a sweet grassy taste (not bitter!)  There is a slight “buttery” tone to the green tea as well … a subtle creaminess that complements the floral tones of the jasmine. The jasmine is a little sharper than it might be in a “pearl” type jasmine (or a jasmine tea without the flowers present).  And while there are some purists that would state that the best jasmine teas are ones without the jasmine flowers or petals in the tea, I kind of like the subtle differences here.  And the price is generally better for a jasmine tea with the flowers than one where all the petals and flowers have been removed … making this a lovely choice for daily jasmine tea consumption.  (I certainly couldn’t afford to drink pearls every day!) A really nice tea for the price … and a really nice tea to enjoy with dinner.  This one is great iced too.  It’s just a really enjoyable tea! The post Jasmine with Flowers Green Tea from Culinary Teas appeared first on SororiTea Sisters.
about 4 hours ago
We’re introducing: Teamugging. It’s basically what it sounds like: Taking a mug shot of your favorite mug.
We’re introducing: Teamugging. It’s basically what it sounds like: Taking a mug shot of your favorite mug.
about 5 hours ago
Google “gluten free” and you will find plenty of information about the pros and cons of this increasingly popular dietary choice. But for people diagnosed with Celiac Disease, the only choice for their gastrointestinal health is giving u...
Google “gluten free” and you will find plenty of information about the pros and cons of this increasingly popular dietary choice. But for people diagnosed with Celiac Disease, the only choice for their gastrointestinal health is giving up gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains. In recognition of Celiac Disease Awareness Month (sometimes celebrated in May), Bigelow Tea is sharing two fantastic gluten-free recipes made with tea! Sure, there are lots of gluten-free products available, but not all of them are healthy. Cooking at home with ordinary ingredients gives you peace of mind … and great taste. Enjoy! Seared Scallops in Lemon Broth Ingredients: 2 cups (500mL) chicken broth 8 Bigelow I Love Lemon® Herb Tea Bags 2 teaspoons (10mL) butter 1 teaspoon (5mL) olive oil 1 pound (500g) sea scallops 2/3 cup (160mL) frozen peas 2 cups (500mL) cooked rice Zest from a whole lemon Yield: Serves 4. Cook Time: 25 minutes. Prep Time 15 minutes. Instructions: Boil chicken broth in small saucepan, remove from heat and add Bigelow I Love Lemon tea bags. Infuse for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, rinse scallops and pat dry. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Add olive oil and butter to large non-stick skillet. When butter is foaming, add scallops and cook flat side down until well browned; turn and cook other side. Cook scallops for approximately 6-8 minutes total time. Bring tea broth to a boil, add peas and cook 4 minutes. Place ½ cup rice each in shallow soup bowls; place scallops evenly over rice, pour lemon pea broth over scallops and garnish with lemon zest. French Style Green Beans Ingredients: 1 cup hot water 4 Bigelow® Green Tea with Pomegranate Tea Bags 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar ½ teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon corn starch 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 pound fresh french-style green beans ½ pound carrots cut into 1 inch matchsticks Salt and pepper to taste Yield: Serves 6 Instructions: Combine hot water and 4 Bigelow® Green Tea with Pomegranate Tea Bags and allow to steep for 5-7 minutes. Place tea in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, and cook until liquid is reduced by half (about ten minutes). Add balsamic vinegar and sugar. Stir to combine. Add cornstarch and whisk vigorously until glaze is thickened and smooth. Set aside. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, combine butter and olive oil. Heat until butter is melted but not smoking and then add carrots and green beans. Saute vegetables until just tender, approximately 5 minutes (allow a few extra minutes of extra cooking time if using traditional green beans). Add pomegranate-balsamic glaze, and toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately. Note: Glaze may be prepared up to 2 days in advance. Store in an airtight container in refrigerator. Photo by lamoix via Flickr.com
about 7 hours ago
Iron Buddha, Iron Goddess of Mercy, Iron Bodhisattva, Tik Goon Yam, Tieguanyin, Tie Guan Yin, Tit Kwon Yin.  These are different spellings of the same tea. Of course this same tea can have a huge spectrum in terms of grade, taste and qua...
Iron Buddha, Iron Goddess of Mercy, Iron Bodhisattva, Tik Goon Yam, Tieguanyin, Tie Guan Yin, Tit Kwon Yin.  These are different spellings of the same tea. Of course this same tea can have a huge spectrum in terms of grade, taste and quality but that is a story for another post.  This post is all about names. More precisely, it is about translated names of Chinese teas and why there is so much disparity. Let us look at some of the main causes of confusion. Multiple Meanings This is a common problem for translators of all languages: multiple meanings for the same word.  Take for example Dinggu Dafang which would probably be machine translated into something like “Peak Valley Generous”.  The “Dafang” in question is actually the name of the inventor which we will look at later.  but for now we will focus on the oxymoron “Peak Valley”. The word “Gu” can mean valley, but in this context, it actually means “Gu Yu” or the harvest rain. Hence it is used to denote the highest grades of Laozhu (name of the mountain) Dafang which are grown near the peak and picked before harvest rain, (20th April), each year. Compound Words The Chinese language is character based and hence numerous compound words or phrases are used, which may be different from their individual meanings.  Take for example Shuixian- a beloved Minbei oolong cultivar, especially when produced in Wuyishan.  Individually the words “Shui” (?) means water and “xian” (?) means fairy, immortal, or some being to that effect.  Hence many tea shops run by non-Chinese speakers would probably translate Shuixian as “Water Immortal”, “Water Sprite” and so forth.  However as a compound word, Shuixian refers to the flower known as Narcissus Tazetta, which can also be represented by Sacred Lily, Daffodil or Narcissus. Color Color is probably an issue only for half of the readers, namely the gents.  You may see “cardinal, crimson, maroon, rose, brick, burgundy, cherry, chestnut, magenta, ad infinitum”, but guys usually see red, literally. Maybe dark red and bright red, but that’s it.  In tea names used in green tea, offhand I can think of ???,? and?which if you ask me in isolation would be “green, green, green and green” respectively.  As a side note, ??, which is another name for oolong tea is often translated as “blue tea” but it looks like dark green to me.  For example, ? is often used to represent the color of grass and no one thinks of grass as “blue” except when it relates to a genre of music. Geographical or Individual Names I mentioned this before that I think generally it makes no sense to translate geographical or individual names. While “Northern Capital” makes sense for Beijing, “Broad East” sounds weird for Guangdong or “Repeated Celebration” for Chongqing.  For instance, “Biluochun” is commonly translated as “green spires spring,” a “mistake” I too have committed before.  However in a couple of texts, it is written that Biluochun was actually so named after Biluo Peak in Dongting Mountain where the tea was first grown.  Hence a ‘proper’ translation would be Biluochun or Biluo Spring. Cultural Differences Cultural differences can also affect the elegance of the translation, both ways.  Take for example Tie Luo Han, a famous Wuyi Yancha.  The most accurate translation for Luo Han is Arhat which is Sankrit for a certain level of enlightenment in Buddhism. Many ethnic Chinese are familiar with this word not because of religion but due to the frequent appearance of the “18 arhats” in various gongfu movies.  Of course if you type “arhat” in Microsoft word (English US) which I am doing at this moment, a red squiggly line appears in non-recognition. I have seen a few translations but I will single out one- “Iron Man”- which depending on the reader would invoke visions of either Ozzy Osbourne or Robert Downey Jr.  Not the worst translation around, but one of the (inadvertently) funniest. Phonetic Translations If we translate based on sound alone, there is some measure of confusi
about 8 hours ago
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Black Where to Buy:  J-Tea Tea Description: The Top Earl is the fusion of two distinct elements.  A high grade, tippy Assam black tea is scented with an ultra pure oil of bergamot to create our favorite earl ...
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Black Where to Buy:  J-Tea Tea Description: The Top Earl is the fusion of two distinct elements.  A high grade, tippy Assam black tea is scented with an ultra pure oil of bergamot to create our favorite earl grey tea. Learn more about this tea here. You can also try some of J-Tea’s teas at Medley Tea House Café Taster’s Review: The other day, I went to afternoon tea with my oldest daughter.  I had heard about a place called Medley Tea House Café, and she and I were both anxious to try a new place for afternoon tea.  Well, lunch was lovely, the food was delicious!  But the most memorable thing for me – aside from my wonderful tea-time companion! – was the Earl Grey tea that I drank!  I liked the “Top Earl” so much that I bought an ounce to take home with me. After looking at the Tea Menu at Medley I learned that their Top Earl Black Tea came from a local company called J-Tea.  This is an outstanding Earl Grey.  If you’ve read very many of my reviews, you’re probably well aware of my love affair with the Earl.  I’m always on the lookout for a stunning Earl Grey and this one is definitely STUNNING! The black tea base is an Assam tea, and I love the difference a rich, malty Assam makes here.  The background notes are full flavored and satisfying.  Smooth with a sweet, caramel-y undertone, this is an Earl Grey that not only tastes great for an afternoon tea, but, it is robust and bold enough to serve as your first cup of the day too.  It is somewhat astringent but not bitter (but don’t oversteep it!) The bergamot is strongly flavored and is a good match for the strength of the Assam.  The Assam tea is strong but the bergamot is on at an even pace with the Assam.  Two strong flavors … but they don’t attempt to compete with each other, instead they just work beautifully together.  The bergamot tastes tangy and bright and citrus-y.  Just like bergamot should.  It doesn’t taste like a man’s cologne. A really outstanding Earl Grey tea, this Top Earl … this one definitely is in my top five … although I’m not sure yet which one it would displace!  If you love Earl Grey like I do – you must try this one! The post Top Earl Black Tea from J-Tea appeared first on SororiTea Sisters.
about 16 hours ago
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Oolong Where to Buy:  Darjeeling Tea Lovers Tea Description: Goomtee Black Dragon, an OOLONG comes from a prestigious tea estate of Darjeeling. Gomtee produces some of the best teas that we have tasted so far...
Tea Information: Leaf Type:  Oolong Where to Buy:  Darjeeling Tea Lovers Tea Description: Goomtee Black Dragon, an OOLONG comes from a prestigious tea estate of Darjeeling. Gomtee produces some of the best teas that we have tasted so far. This oolong is a stand alone tea from their house. Long semi fermented leaves when steeped for 3 minutes gives a roasted chocolate flavour which makes this tea a must try for tea lovers. Learn more about this tea here. Taster’s Review: So far, the teas that I’ve tried from Darjeeling Tea Lovers have been all Darjeeling teas, so I was excited to finally be trying this Goomtee Black Dragon Oolong First Flush from them!  An Oolong from the Darjeeling Region, even!   Exciting! The aroma of the dry leaf was earthy and sweet, with notes of an indistinguishable fruit … it had a fruit-like sweetness to the scent but, it was difficult to place exactly what fruit I was smelling.  The brewed liquid smells more fruity … a fruit note that lies somewhere between plum and apricot and nectarine.  I also smell a distinct “sweet” note that reminds me of cocoa with hints of burnt sugar. The flavor is superb!  Peach-like notes with floral hints.  The promises of chocolate from the fragrance come alive in the flavor as well.  Not a strong chocolate-y presence but certainly a welcome one.  The chocolate notes seem to be more distinct when I aerate the sip with a slurp, so this is a tea that is definitely worth slurping!  Yeah, don’t worry about it, nobody’s listening … go ahead and slurp! The chocolate notes are not “slap you in the face” kind of chocolate notes … but, that’s OK.  Yes, the chocoholic that always says more chocolate = better just said that!  That’s because I love it when I find a pure tea like this that has natural notes of cocoa.  This tea is pure joy! The texture is soft and smooth and there is some astringency toward the finish.  The aftertaste is sweet with just a hint of “tangy” from the stone fruit notes coming through.  Subsequent infusions bring the chocolate notes into the foreground!  Chocolate lovers … you’ll want to indulge in several infusions with this tea! I am in agreement with the description above – this tea is definitely a MUST TRY for tea lovers … and for chocolate lovers too! The post Goomtee Black Dragon Oolong First Flush from Darjeeling Tea Lovers appeared first on SororiTea Sisters.
1 day ago
In your busy schedule every minute is precious, so it’s good to know the real time things take, not the “fast-talking salesman going through his spiel” time. They are masters at making their products seem easier, faster, and overall bett...
In your busy schedule every minute is precious, so it’s good to know the real time things take, not the “fast-talking salesman going through his spiel” time. They are masters at making their products seem easier, faster, and overall better than that “junk” you have now. Tea is no exception. As a former project manager, […]
1 day ago
From the time human beings first began devising machines there have probably been other humans decrying the use of those machines and calling for a return to simpler ways. Perhaps one of the best known historical examples of this were th...
From the time human beings first began devising machines there have probably been other humans decrying the use of those machines and calling for a return to simpler ways. Perhaps one of the best known historical examples of this were the Luddites, 19th-century weavers who revolted at the introduction of machinery they worried would make […]
1 day ago
I’m rarely surprised anymore when reading a book or watching a movie. It’s not that I’m jaded. It’s that they have become formulaic. Expected. Commonplace. This novel appeared to be the same. However, the author at one point managed to s...
I’m rarely surprised anymore when reading a book or watching a movie. It’s not that I’m jaded. It’s that they have become formulaic. Expected. Commonplace. This novel appeared to be the same. However, the author at one point managed to surprise — in fact, more than once in the first half of the novel — while entertaining. I had some “aw geez, don’t go there” moments when things started getting a bit cliché, though. Then, it seemed to get better, then near the end…well, getting a bit ahead of myself here.The good points of the novel: 1) the use of a literary device of omniscience and the rather cute way he has of informing his audience he is doing this; 2) the use of language (I have to point out, though, that this is as much due to the translator as the author, since the novel was written originally in Spanish); and 3) the historical references being tied together in an artful way. Considering that the novel takes place in England but was written by someone born and raised in Spain, the novel has a very authentic British feel to it.The bad points of the novel: 1) overly graphic in some places; 2) just plain silly in others; and 3) rather disappointing overall, sort of like sitting down to a meal that smells good and initially tastes good but that ends up being rather mediocre.Some reviewers have “ooh”ed and “aah”ed over this book. I cannot join their chorus. After leading readers through an almost tortuous labyrinth about the myth of time travel, and after making sure his readers know that time travel is not possible, he twists around and proposes the opposite. Rubbish! And very disappointing. This is presented as a murder mystery, not fantasy fiction. When I reached that point in the novel, I kept hoping that Senor Palma was once again going to reveal the hoax, as he had done twice previously. Sadly, those hopes were dashed. Worse yet was the fizzling nature of the last chapter or so. After all that winding back and forth previously and involving such historical figures as H.G. Wells in his journey, the nature of the ending was a huge let down.One final note: there was one good thing about the novel, and that was the wonderful tea I enjoyed while reading it.© 2013 A.C. Cargill photos and text
1 day ago