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The East Winds Film Festival, put on by Conventry University's East Asian Film Society, will present the European premiere of the record-breaking Thai box-office smash Pee Mak Phra Khanong (??????...???????), with special guest director...
The East Winds Film Festival, put on by Conventry University's East Asian Film Society, will present the European premiere of the record-breaking Thai box-office smash Pee Mak Phra Khanong (??????...???????), with special guest director Banjong Pisanthanakun. The fest will also screen the U.K. premiere of Banjong's solo feature debut, the hit 2010 romantic comedy Hello Stranger. And to round out the East Winds Thailand Showcase, the fest will host the international premiere of the "arthouse" horror Pawnshop, directed by Parm Rangsri and starring Krissada Sukosol Clapp. which is part of the festival's Halloween night "East Winds Chills" program. Aside from the Thai selection, a big highlight will be the opening film, the European premiere of Dustin Nguyen's directorial debut, the action-packed epic "Eastern western" Once Upon a Time in Vietnam. The East Winds Film Festival – the U.K.’s only major showcase of East Asian cinema outside of London and the first of its kind in the Midlands – will take place at Coventry University’s purpose-built digital cinema facility at its student center, The HUB, from October 31 to November 3.ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
about 5 hours ago
Five Star Production, one of Thailand's oldest movie studios, has a launched a new foundation named after its late founders, the Kiat-Charoen Iamphungporn Foundation, that will be devoted to the education of new filmmaking talents. Fi...
Five Star Production, one of Thailand's oldest movie studios, has a launched a new foundation named after its late founders, the Kiat-Charoen Iamphungporn Foundation, that will be devoted to the education of new filmmaking talents. Film Business Asia has more details: Headed by Saicharoon Iamphungporn, who serves as president, the foundation is well supported by the industry with a seven-member committee and 24 consultants consisting of exhibitors, directors, producers, post production houses and animation companies. To nurture new talents, the foundation will offer classes conducted by top Thai filmmakers. The first class is on scriptwriting which will be held on eight weekends in January and February 2014. Thirty students – selected from over 500 applicants – will attend. In addition to Five Star, industry executives from GTH and Phranakorn have kicked in start-up funds. Instructors will include Five Star alum Pen-ek Ratanaruang, GTH talents Banjong Pisanthanakun and Jira Maligool, indie producers Aditya Assarat and Soros Sukhum ans screenwriter Amraporn Pandinthong. Please see Film Business Asia for the full story.ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
about 5 hours ago
Wichanon Sumumjarn, the award-winning maker of Four Boys, White Whiskey and Grilled Mouse and the feature In April the Following Year, There was a Fire, is the latest director to turn to crowd-funding. He's making a short called Somew...
Wichanon Sumumjarn, the award-winning maker of Four Boys, White Whiskey and Grilled Mouse and the feature In April the Following Year, There was a Fire, is the latest director to turn to crowd-funding. He's making a short called Somewhere Only We Know, about Bee, a country girl working in Bangkok. She spends a night with her ex-boyfriend. The goal is raise 100,000 baht, or about $3,200. For $20, you get a DVD of the film. Donate $50 and you'll get a "special thanks" in the credits. Contribute $500 and you'll get executive producer credit. Contributors will also be listed on the Facebook page for Wichanon's next feature project, Beer Girl. For more details, check out the campaign page at Electric Eel Films.ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
about 5 hours ago
The Luang Prabang Film Festival, which a couple days ago announced its 2013 lineup of Southeast Asian movies, has a couple other things going on – a poster-design contest and the Lao Filmmakers Fund. Here's the details on the movie ...
The Luang Prabang Film Festival, which a couple days ago announced its 2013 lineup of Southeast Asian movies, has a couple other things going on – a poster-design contest and the Lao Filmmakers Fund. Here's the details on the movie poster design contest: Any designer living in Southeast Asia is invited to submit a movie poster design for a fictitious film called My Mother's Wedding. This is not an existing movie, nor one in production, so we encourage graphic designers to imagine what might happen in the film, who the main characters are, and how the film might take place in their own country of origin. First Place prize is $750, and the Top 20 will be displayed at the LPFF Visitor Center during the festival. Meanwhile, there's the Lao Filmmakers Fund. Here's more about that: The fund is publicly generated, and allows filmmakers in Laos to apply for small grants to help make their film projects possible. Grants are currently available once per year. Successful projects will be chosen by the Luang Prabang Film Festival's Board of Directors, based on the merits of the project, as well as an organized and feasible plan for execution. In our first year, the maximum grant Aaount is $3000 USD. Deadline for entries is October 15. For more details, hit up the links above or the festival's Facebook page. The Luang Prabang Film Festival runs from December 7 to 11 in the UNESCO World Heritage former royal capital of Laos. ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
3 days ago
It's an interesting week for fans of Southeast Asian cinema in Bangkok, with the release of Ilo Ilo, the first Singaporean film to be awarded at the Cannes Film Festival and the city-state's submission to next year's Academy Awards. T...
It's an interesting week for fans of Southeast Asian cinema in Bangkok, with the release of Ilo Ilo, the first Singaporean film to be awarded at the Cannes Film Festival and the city-state's submission to next year's Academy Awards. There's also Karaoke Girl, the debut feature by indie Thai filmmaker Visra Vichet-Vadakan. A fixture from this year's festival circuit, Karaoke Girl is an experimental documentary and drama about a young woman who works as a bar "hostess" in Bangkok. And as a weird aside, there's Mor Hok/Haa Pak Maa Taa Pee, the first 3D movie from Phranakorn Production and controversial director Poj Arnon. Ilo Ilo is a family drama set against the backdrop of the 1997 financial crisis. Directed by Anthony Chen, the partly autobiographical story is about a Filipina maid who moves into an apartment with an ethnic Chinese family. She becomes a confidant to the bratty spoiled schoolboy son and newly unemployed dad, earning her a hairy eyeball from the pregnant domineering mother. By coincidence, Ilo Ilo has a Bangkok connection, thanks to one of its producers, Wahyuni A. Hadi, wife of Thai indie filmmaker Aditya Assarat and herself one of the driving forces behind the promotion of Singaporean independent cinema. Winner of the Cannes Camera d'Or Award for best first feature – the first Singaporean film to be awarded at Cannes – Ilo Ilo is at House on RCA. Check out the trailer embedded below. Karaoke Girl (????????????, Sao Karaoke) depicts the grim life of a young woman who works as an escort. The debut feature of Visra is the story of Sa, a country girl who was sent to Bangkok when she was just 15. After three years in a factory, she entered the sex trade in order to support her family. Four years later the filmmaker met her, documented her life in the city and in the country and also wrote a fictional script for her to act in. The story is drawn from Sa's actual experiences, threading memories of her rural childhood with the complicated reality of her urban life. Boasting impressive credits, with New York University professor and Salaam Bombay cinematographer Sandi Sissel as a director of photography, Karaoke Girl premiered in the main competition at this year's International Film Festival Rotterdam, where it earned positive reviews. and was featured a bunch of other fests, including Helsinki and London's Terracotta Far East Film Festival as well as Karlovy Vary, Vancouver, Jeonju, Hamburg and Luxembourg City. It won the award for Emerging International Filmmaker at London's Open City Docs Fest. Happily, the film had a positive effect on Sa, and she's turned her back on her old life, according to the filmmaker. Karaoke Girl is in limited release at the Apex cinemas in Siam Square and the Esplanade Cineplex Ratchada. It'll open next week at Major Cineplex Airport Plaza Chiang Mai and at Bangkok's House cinema on October 17. The trailer is embedded below. Mor Hok/Haa Pak Maa Taa Pee (??6/5 ?????? ?????, a.k.a. Make Me Shudder is the first stab into 3D by B-movie studio Phranakorn and schlock filmmaker Poj Arnon. The horror comedy is about young schoolboys in short pants who challenge themselves by entering haunted buildings. I don't know what else to say about this, except it looks like utter nonsense but I will still watch it because I haven't filled my Poj Arnon quota this year. The trailer is embedded below. ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
5 days ago
Karaoke GirlThe life of a Bangkok escort is depicted in Karaoke Girl (????????????, Sao Karaoke), the debut feature of young independent filmmaker Visra Vichet-Vadakan.It's the story of Sa, a country girl who was sent to Bangkok when she...
Karaoke GirlThe life of a Bangkok escort is depicted in Karaoke Girl (????????????, Sao Karaoke), the debut feature of young independent filmmaker Visra Vichet-Vadakan.It's the story of Sa, a country girl who was sent to Bangkok when she was just 15. After three years in a factory, she entered the sex trade in order to support her family. Four years later the filmmaker met her, documented her life in the city and in the country and also wrote a fictional script for her to act in. The story is drawn from Sa's actual experiences, threading memories of her rural childhood with the complicated reality of her urban life.Boasting impressive credits, with New York University professor and Salaam Bombay cinematographer Sandi Sissel as a director of photography, Karaoke Girl premiered in the main competition at this year's International Film Festival Rotterdam, where it earned positive reviews. It went on many other fests, including Helsinki and London's Terracotta Far East Film Festival as well as Karlovy Vary, Vancouver, Jeonju, Hamburg and Luxembourg City. It won the award for Emerging International Filmmaker at London's Open City Docs Fest.Happily, the film had a positive effect on Sa, and she's turned her back on her old life, according to the filmmaker.Karaoke Girl is in limited release at the Apex cinemas in Siam Square and the Esplanade Cineplex Ratchada. It'll open next week at Major Cineplex Airport Plaza Chiang Mai and at Bangkok's House cinema on October 17. The trailer is embedded below.In limited release, shows are at 6.30 nightly at the Apex's Lido in Siam Square and 7pm at Esplanade Cineplex Ratchada. Next week, it moves to Chiang's Mai's Major Cineplex Airport Plaza and returns to Bangkok on October 17 for a run at House on RCA. Rated G.Also openingIlo Ilo – The first Singaporean feature to win an award at the Cannes Film Festival and the city-state's submission for next year's Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film is a family drama set against the backdrop of the 1997 financial crisis. Anthony Chen's debut film is the partly autobiographical story about a Filipina maid who moves into an apartment with a Singaporean Chinese family. She bonds with the family's bratty spoiled schoolboy and newly unemployed dad but clashes with the domineering mother. By coincidence, Ilo Ilo has a Bangkok connection, thanks to one of its producers, Wahyuni A. Hadi, wife of Thai indie filmmaker Aditya Assarat (Wonderful Town, Hi-So) and herself one of the driving forces behind the promotion of Singaporean independent cinema. Winner of the Cannes Camera d'Or Award for best first feature, Ilo Ilo's critical reception is generally positive. It's at House on RCA.Gravity – The Oscars are months away, but Academy Award buzz already surrounds three of the releases this week, including this astronauts-in-peril drama directed by Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men, Y Tu Mamá También), headlined by the stellar Oscar-winning pair of George Clooney and Sandra Bullock. She's a medical engineer on a space research mission with Clooney as a veteran astronaut. On a seemingly routine spacewalk, disaster strikes and the space shuttle is destroyed, leaving the two completely alone, floating in space. Following premieres in Venice, Telluride and Toronto, critical reception is overwhelmingly positive. It's in converted 3D in some cinemas, including IMAX. Rated G.Prisoners – Hugh Jackman is acting like a guy who has his eye on a little golden statue in this taut drama about a father who becomes increasingly desperate and angry after his six-year-old daughter and her little friend go missing. A police detective (Jake Gyllenhaal) tracks down a suspect (Paul Dano) in a broken-down RV but then has to let the mentally not-all-there man go due to lack of evidence. So Jackman takes things into his own hands. Maria Bello, Viola Davis and Terrence Howard also star. Denis Villeneuve (Incendies) directs. Prisoners premiered to much acclaim at this year's Telluride fest
5 days ago
The world premieres of a pair of Lao films are among the highlights of this year's Luang Prabang Film Festival (LPFF), which will take place from December 7 to 11. As always, LPFF will celebrate the best cinema from across Southeast A...
The world premieres of a pair of Lao films are among the highlights of this year's Luang Prabang Film Festival (LPFF), which will take place from December 7 to 11. As always, LPFF will celebrate the best cinema from across Southeast Asia, and create a space for regional film professionals and fans to network, dialogue, and encourage local film production. All screenings and activities of the festival are free and open to the public. Selected by LPFF's Motion Picture Ambassadors (film experts in each of the participating countries), the 28 feature films in the fourth annual festival will be: 13:00 Sunday (Laos) A River Changes Course (Cambodia) Ah, Boys to Men (Singapore) Big Heart (Laos) [World Premiere] Boundary (Cambodia/Thailand) Contradiction (Malaysia) Dancing Across Borders (Cambodia) Deenok and Dareng (Indonesia) Grean Fictions (Thailand) Hak Aum Lum (Laos) Headshot (Thailand) Here or There? (Vietnam) The Hidden: Wrath of Azazil (Malaysia) Home (Thailand) I Love Savan (Laos) [World Premiere] Karaoke Girl (Thailand) Kil (Malaysia) Lovely Man (Indonesia) Mater Dolorosa (Philippines) P-047 (Thailand) Red Scarf (Laos) Rising Sun on the Horizon (Myanmar) Scent of Burning Grass (Vietnam) Tangwong (Thailand) Thy Womb (Philippines) What is it about Rina? (Brunei) What isn't There (Philippines) What They Don't Talk About When They Talk About Love (Indonesia) In addition to these feature films, LPFF will also have multiple short film programs, including all 21 Southeast Asian documentary films from DocNet's first ChopShots collection. The six short films from LPFF's "Our Lives on Film" Documentary Filmmaking Workshop will be featured, as well. There will be panel discussions, Q-and-As, a concert, and dance and puppetry performances to entertain visitors during the festival. Several exhibitions will be on display at the LPFF Visitor Center, including the best designs from the festival's movie poster competition (accepting entries until October 15), and an update on the Southeast Asia Movie Theater Project. Coca-Cola, Heineken, Chillax Productions, Khiri Travel, Lane Xang Minerals, and the US Embassy are all major sponsors of this year's festival. Currently, a crowdsourcing campaign is underway to provide LPFF with mobile screening equipment via CineFund. For further information on the festival, visit www.lpfilmfest.org (currently under renovation), or stay up to date at Facebook.com/lpfilmfest. To book discounted tours and travel arrangements to attend the festival, e-mail Khiri Travel, LPFF's Official Travel Partner, at sales.laos@khiri.com.ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
7 days ago
A scene from The Guardian. The Style by Toyota 9FilmFest was held over the weekend of September 21-22 at Bangkok's Paragon Cineplex, showing the latest crop of nine-minute films made especially for the festival. Each film had to inc...
A scene from The Guardian. The Style by Toyota 9FilmFest was held over the weekend of September 21-22 at Bangkok's Paragon Cineplex, showing the latest crop of nine-minute films made especially for the festival. Each film had to incorporate this year's "9 signature item", which was "waterway". Top prize was a brand-new Toyota Vios, which went to The Guardians, a drama about a river village's "crazy man", who is in mourning over the drowning of his young son. He's determined to learn to swim. It also won best actor. A winner of several other awards was Lie, the tale of a middle-aged man who poses on the Internet as a handsome pop singer. Here's the winners: Screenwriter – Lie, Narongchai Parthumsuwan Costume design – The Great River, Steven Rouse Leadership Award – Distortion, Thana Chairatanasil Best editor – Teppanyaki Kamakazi, Jeremy Zag and Raymond Lewin Best producer – Clueless?, Byron Bishop, Sahajak Boonthanakit and Peter Alan Lloyd Special jury prize – Lie, Narongchai Parthumsuwan Best actor – Lie, Supachai Gertsuwan Best actress – Clueless?, Joy Villanueva Best cinematography – Bangkruai Pradesh, Pathara Buranadilok Best creativity – The Cream, Naruphon Punphairoj and Satit Ngerntong Best film – The Guardians, Disspong Sampattavanich Prizes were handed out by jury that included Prachya Pinkaew, MR Chalermchatri "Adam" Yukol, Tanwarin Sukkhapisit (Golf), Ananda Everingham, "Pop" Areeya Sirisopa adn "Ted" Yuthana Boon-orm, with other celebrities in attendance including "Poo" Vithaya Pansringarm, Jill Roger and Cindy Bishop. ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
8 days ago
The HeatMelissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock show that female police officers can run, gun and swear just as well as the best of their male counterparts in The Heat.This mismatched-buddy-cop comedy has Bullock as an uptight and talented F...
The HeatMelissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock show that female police officers can run, gun and swear just as well as the best of their male counterparts in The Heat.This mismatched-buddy-cop comedy has Bullock as an uptight and talented FBI special agent. She is perhaps too uptight and talented, because she constantly shows up her colleagues – even the police dog – and never admits she's wrong. She has alienated everyone around her. Determined to move up in rank and further prove herself, Bullock is given one more chance by her supervisor (a wonderfully weary Damian Bichir) – go to Boston to investigate a drug ring.There, in Beantown, McCarthy is a tough foul-mouthed police detective who only works alone and is feared by criminals and cops alike. She is basically a female version of Gene Hackman in The French Connection.So, of course, these two cops who don't play well with others have to partner up to solve the case.Paul Feig (Bridesmaids) directs.Critical reception is mixed, leaning to positive. It's at SF cinemas only. Rated 15+.Also openingRush – Director Ron Howard takes on the fast-paced world of Formula One auto racing with this look back at the 1976 rivalry on and off the track between womanizing English driver James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and the methodical, brilliant Austrian, Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl). It premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, and critical reception is generally positive. Rated 15+.Runner Runner – Justin Timberlake matches wits with Ben Affleck in this thriller about the world of Internet poker. Timberlake is a hotshot college student to gambles for his tuition money and loses. He then decides to confront the man who beat him (Affleck) – a criminal mastermind living in style in Costa Rica. Gemma Arterton also stars. This doesn't open in the U.S. until next week, so critical reception isn't registering yet. Rated 13+.Pawn Shop Chronicles – This shaggy-dog action-comedy has three storylines revolving around a small-town pawn shop. They involve a man searching for his kidnapped wife, a sad-sack Elvis impersonator and white-supremacist meth heads. Matt Dillon, Brendan Fraser, Elijah Wood. Vincent D’Onofrio and Paul Walker star. Wayne Kramer (The Cooler, Running Scared) directs. This had a limited release in the U.S. earlier this summer and critical reception is a bit unknown. It's at SF cinemas only. Rated 18+.Also showingThe Friese-Greene Club – Catch the great Peter Sellers in one of his earliest performances in the 1959 comedy I'm All Right Jack. David Cronenberg demonstrates the proper way to do a horror remake with the 1986 classic The Fly, starring Jeff Goldblum as "Seth Brundlefly" and Geena Davis. Gross-out stunts are in store in Saturday's "midnight movie", John Waters' Pink Flamingos. And Sunday's classic is the 1939 romantic drama Goodbye Mr. Chips. Shows start at 8pm. The FGC is down an alley next to the Queen's Park Imperial Hotel on Sukhumvit Soi 22. It's open Wednesday through Sunday from around 6pm. With just nine seats, the screening room fills up fast, so please check the website to make bookings.Inspecteur Lavardin – The Alliance Française Bangkok has moved from its old location on South Sathorn to new digs in the Lumpini area at 179 Thanon Witthayu (Wireless Road). And after taking a month off to get resituated, the weekly free movies resume with a line-up of crime dramas, starting with Claude Chabrol's 1986 murder mystery. It's in French with English subtitles. The show's on at 7.30pm on Wednesday, October 2.Sneak previewsPrisoners – Oscar buzz is already surrounding this child-abduction drama starring Hugh Jackman. He's a family man who becomes increasingly desperate and angry after his six-year-old daughter goes missing. A police detective (Jake Gyllenhaal) tracks down a suspect (Paul Dano) but then has to let the mentally not-all-there man go due to lack of evidence. So Jackman takes things into his own
12 days ago
The psychological thriller Countdown (??????????) is Thailand's submission to the 86th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film. Directed by Nattawut Poonpiriya and produced by the GTH studio, Countdown is about a trio of young T...
The psychological thriller Countdown (??????????) is Thailand's submission to the 86th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film. Directed by Nattawut Poonpiriya and produced by the GTH studio, Countdown is about a trio of young Thai hipsters in New York who are trapped in their apartment and terrorized on New Year's Eve by an unhinged drug dealer named Jesus. The film has been a hit on the festival circuit and won awards at home, particularly for actor David Assavanond as the goateed pusher. Countdown is perhaps a surprising choice for Thailand's Oscar submission, but then perhaps not with GTH chief executive Visute Poolvoralucks currently heading the industry's Federation of National Film Associations of Thailand, which handles the Academy Award pick. Water-cooler talk had it that the mega-hit horror comedy Pee Mak Phrakanong, also a GTH film, might be submitted. Another contender among pundits was the indie teenage drama Tang Wong, a current critical favorite that touches on Thai traditional dance – an element that made it seem like a shoe-in for the Thai Oscar pick. But in the end, it was Countdown, which was released in Thai cinemas last December. It's GTH's third submission, following the The Tin Mine (???’??? ?????????) in 2005 and Best of Times (?????????? ????????????) in 2009. Thailand's pick joins several other Southeast Asian entries, including a handful of films from countries outside the region. Australia is submitting The Rocket, a Lao-Isaan family drama directed by Kim Mordaunt that was filmed partly in Laos and partly in Thailand and features a mostly Thai cast. Three Tagalog films are in the running. The Philippines has submitted Hannah Espia's Israel-set immigration drama Transit, which also is in Hebrew. Singapore's pick is Anthony Chen's family drama Ilo Ilo, which also has Mandarin, Hokkien and hopefully not too much English. And the U.K. is submitting Sean Ellis' crime drama Metro Manila. Vietnam had intended to submit the historical drama Thien Menh Anh Hung (Blood Letter), but withdrew because it wasn't released during the qualifying timeframe of October 2012 to September 30 of this year. (Via Jediyuth)ATTENTION: This is a post from Wise Kwai's Thai Film Journal. The url for the source blog is http://thaifilmjournal.blogspot.com. If you're seeing this post anywhere besides your personal feed reader or a couple of social-networking sites, then it might be being misused against the spirit in which it is made freely available.
16 days ago