The Seventh Seal

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Hour of the Wolf (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)When one gets into art house cinema masters, it is mandatory to step into Ingmar Bergman’s territory. With such landmarks as The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, The Virgin Spring, Cries and Whisper...
Hour of the Wolf (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)When one gets into art house cinema masters, it is mandatory to step into Ingmar Bergman’s territory. With such landmarks as The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, The Virgin Spring, Cries and Whispers, Persona, and Fanny and Alexander just to name a few. But once a cinephile has seen all the major films from Bergman there’s another level of films into his vast filmography. Into those titles you find interesting pictures that explore a concept, a sentiment, or a state of mind more clumsily than his aforementioned work, but still, very strong films. Lesser Bergman is still better than most of the mainstream film out there. Of Bergman’s films, few are genre pictures because he did some but none are really stuck into the genres and he gets his on twist on the genre. With Hour of the Wolf, or Vargtimmen for the purists, Bergman makes horror with a film that gets into your mind and let a lot to the imagination except the beautiful body of Ingrid Thulin. Told in flashbacks by Liv Ullman the young wife of an ill artist (Max Von Sydow), the story is about the disappearance of the husband following an encounter of the rich people living in a castle nearby their home on the same island. Not much is explained and seen and we learn that the artist has remorse of guilt and is very distant with his wife. He also has an enduring passion for a past love (Ingrid Thulin). Many of Bergman’s usual themes are present, the couple, the absence of an infant, the guilt, the tormented artist, and a theatrical-like performance is featured. Aside from being truly Bergmanian, Hour of the Wolf seems more like a quick draft from its creator more than a refined diamond like his other great work. One must not watch this for the horror factor because he will be let on his appetite. It is more psychological and mysterious as a film than really a horror film. Some scenes are shot with great mastery and Sven Nykvist’s masterful print is again near perfect. The mise en scene deserves a mention just by itself and would have gained a lot if was better handled with a more solid script.Over a career that started in the 1940’s and that ended in the 2000’s, even a director as talented as Ingmar Bergman could have put a more average film. Well compared to his better work it is indeed average. But put into the History of Cinema it is quite interesting and would probably not been on my list of 1000 greatest films but it would be a definite film that any Bergman enthusiast should watch sometime.
about 3 hours ago
Hi haterrrrr Adam Levine Subliminally Calls Lady Gaga Unoriginal “The Voice” coach and Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine recently got into a mini beef with wild-child popstress Lady Gaga after he sent a series of subliminally sha...
Hi haterrrrr Adam Levine Subliminally Calls Lady Gaga Unoriginal “The Voice” coach and Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine recently got into a mini beef with wild-child popstress Lady Gaga after he sent a series of subliminally shady tweets that Gaga felt were directed towards her. via THG The Voice coach and Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine has never been one to mince words, but his surprise Twitter feud with Lady Gaga was, well, surprising. He recently tweeted about an unidentified artist: “Ugh… recycling old art for a younger generation doesn’t make you an artist. It makes you an art teacher.” “I unabashedly love writing and performing pop music for both myself AND everyone around me. That’s It. It doesn’t need any extra sauce.” Lady Gaga, presuming this was about her, responded: “uh oh guys the art police is here.” It seems relatively obvious that The Voice mentor was referring to Gaga – she certainly seemed to think so – and her artistic “Applause” music video. In it, she references a number of famous works of art, such as the 1957 film The Seventh Seal and Sandro Botticelli’s 1486 painting, “The Birth of Venus.” Welp…..imitation IS the highest form of flattery, especially in today’s entertainment industry. Do you agree with Adam’s comments, or do you think he’s just being a hater?
12 days ago
Here’s a little tip about tech blogs, and journalism in general: absolutely everything you read is one hundred percent true, except in the cases where you – the reader – know anything about the story being discussed. Th...
Here’s a little tip about tech blogs, and journalism in general: absolutely everything you read is one hundred percent true, except in the cases where you – the reader – know anything about the story being discussed. Those stores on Wired and CNet where a device using an ARM Cortex-M3 is described as having, “the same CPU as a modern-day smart phone?” Totally legit, unless you know that running Android on such a chip is a virtual impossibility. Such is the case with ‘key 3D printing patents set to expire in 2014′ – a phrase bandied about tech blogs with the fervency of news the seventh seal has been broken. If you believe everything you read on the Internet, we’re looking at a world of 3D printed lollipops, unicorns, and rainbows in just a few short months. Following the logic of journalistic veracity above, this obviously isn’t the case. What does the expiration of these patents actually mean, then? Let’s Back Up A Bit Here The current crop of 3D printers use fused deposition modelling, FDM, or the ‘squirting melted plastic’ method. This technique was patented in 1989 by [Scott Crump], co-founder of Stratasys, one of the largest manufacturers of 3D printers. This patent expired in 2009, and there’s no coincidence 3D printing really started to pick up around that time with the development of the Reprap Mendel and the founding of what was previously the Open Hardware community’s golden child, Makerbot. If past results are any indication of future performance, the expiration of these key 3D printing patents will result in yet another boom in the field of one-off manufacturing, rapid prototyping, and some really cool projects coming out of hackerspaces in the next year or two. And Here Are The Patents The ‘key patents‘ (just search for [Carl R. Deckard] as the inventor if you want more) referenced by hundreds of articles spread out all over the Internet involve selective laser sintering. What is SLS, you ask? It’s actually pretty simple: take some powder, shoot it with a laser, let the powder melt, and put a dusting of new powder over the mess you just created. You can use a wide range of plastics with SLS compared to the FDM Repraps and Makerbots we have today; you can even print in metal and make yourself a rocket engine. If NASA is doing it, it has to be awesome, right? So What Makes SLS So Great? Even though the current lineup of ‘squirting plastic’ printers is fairly capable and can do a lot in the right hands, there’s some stuff an FDM machine such as a RepRap or Makerbot can’t do. Overhangs are possible, but for very intricate shapes – a one foot tall scale model of the Eiffel Tower, perhaps – you’re looking at a world of hurt. The only way an FDM machine could print something like that is with two filaments, using one material as a support and later dissolving it away. The same goes with printing parts inside parts like the popular ‘ball in a cage’ carving project. No squirting plastic 3D printer can do this without supports, but an SLS machine makes it very, very easy. SLS also allows for many, many different materials. While most FDM machines will not see a filament besides ABS and PLA, laser sintering machines can print in just about any powder that melts. Everything from nylon to polycarbonate to metals are possible with laser sintering. Finally. lasers allow for much higher accuracy than the most common 3D printers. While very accurate FDM machines can print with an accuracy equal to that of a human hair, this isn’t the case for the majority of RepRappers out there. SLS simply doesn’t have the problems of oozing and misaligned layers so common in home-built printers. Why You Won’t Have an SLS Printer in Your Garage Oversimplifying everything a great deal, these printers are basically made of two parts: a laser cutter on top, and a plunger
26 days ago
The Brooklyn Bridge Park summer movie series will likely conclude this Thursday night with a screening of the inane and idiocratic eyesore Sharknado, a movie so dumb and unwatchable it makes Snakes On A Plane seem like The Seventh Seal. ...
The Brooklyn Bridge Park summer movie series will likely conclude this Thursday night with a screening of the inane and idiocratic eyesore Sharknado, a movie so dumb and unwatchable it makes Snakes On A Plane seem like The Seventh Seal. Why is Brooklyn Bridge Park screening a schlocky wannabe Troma disaster flick whose strained and calculated irony barely extends past the one-liner premise of the title? BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE VOTING FOR IT. [ more › ]
about 1 month ago
We watched the movie Ted last week but this post isn't about that movie. The movie has several references to the 1980 movie Flash Gordon including an extended cameo by Sam Jones who played Flash. Flash Gordon and its soundtrack from Que...
We watched the movie Ted last week but this post isn't about that movie. The movie has several references to the 1980 movie Flash Gordon including an extended cameo by Sam Jones who played Flash. Flash Gordon and its soundtrack from Queen saved me senior year of high school--whenever I felt down I would listen to the album and run the movie through my head escaping reality for a little bit. These were the days before videos and CDs, now I've rewatched the movie several times on DVD. Flash Gordon was not a great movie by any means but it resonated with me with its action sequences, great music and corny lines like "Flash, I love you, but we only have fourteen hours to save the Earth!". The stars of the movie Sam Jones and Melody Anderson were and still are relatively unknown but it had a great supporting cast. Topol, best known as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof, played a scientist who many mocked for his crazy (but true) ideas of what was happening in outer space. Basically the same character as when he played Galileo. Timothy Dalton played Prince Barin and would go on to be James Bond and the Max von Sydow, who played chess against Death in The Seventh Seal, was the Ming the Merciless. What does this all have to do with computational complexity? Absolutely nothing. But today I turn 50, it's my party and I'll post what I want to.
about 1 month ago
Through the Silence of Winter Light: Ingmar Bergman Classics Collection: 1. The Seventh Seal, 1957. 2. Wild Strawberries, 1957. 3. The Virgin Spring, 1960. 4. Through a Glass Darkly, 1961. 5. Persona, 1966. 6. Cries and Whispers, 1972. 7...
Through the Silence of Winter Light: Ingmar Bergman Classics Collection: 1. The Seventh Seal, 1957. 2. Wild Strawberries, 1957. 3. The Virgin Spring, 1960. 4. Through a Glass Darkly, 1961. 5. Persona, 1966. 6. Cries and Whispers, 1972. 7. Autumn Sonata, 1978. 8. Fanny and Alexander, 1982
about 1 month ago
For the past year, Rakim has shared countless stories on coming up as an MC that goes to show his influence on hip-hop is still important. He’s appeared on many underground mixtapes this year—Macro Polo’s Newport Authority 2 and Aaron La...
For the past year, Rakim has shared countless stories on coming up as an MC that goes to show his influence on hip-hop is still important. He’s appeared on many underground mixtapes this year—Macro Polo’s Newport Authority 2 and Aaron LaCrate’s Milkcrate Athletics—but Ra is just getting warmed up. On his fifth studio album, he’s ready to deliver his exceptional lyricism with the right producers. “He sent me some heat, man,” Rakim tells XXL about his upcoming LaCrate collaboration. “I was just telling him just now I can feel the hairs growing out of my head talking about it. He’s a dope producer.” LaCrate, who helped popularize the B-more gutter sound, is supplying Ra with a few beats that are right up his alley. The God MC was mum on specific details of the track, but he was confident his first collaboration with him will be “something crazy.” “I don’t want to let the cat of the bag. But, the track he hit me with was a no-brainer,” he said. “As soon as I heard it, I was like, ‘Yo, man. This is not only what I need, I think this is what the game need too.’” As one of the pioneers in hip-hop’s golden age, Rakim has a distinct style that sounds serious rather than conforms to accessible trends. In the three years since his last album, The Seventh Seal, he plans on sticking to the same formula—to write music that upholds his legacy. “It’s all good what some of the cats are doing today, but that ain’t Rakim,” he said. “I would never jump on a bandwagon and do what somebody is doing. First of all, that ain’t my style! Nah mean? Second of all, that ain’t my style! You feel me? Again, hip-hop is here for us. You gotta not take it for granted. We gotta do what we want to do from the heart. And keep in mind the elders, what the first-borns had in mind with this hip-hop thing.” Rakim’s new album is slated for 2013. He is also reportedly in the studio with Pharrell working on some material. The post Rakim Discusses Aaron LaCrate Collaboration For New Album appeared first on XXL.
about 1 month ago
Danny Brown and Action Bronson are high. How high are they? 2 HIGH 2 DIE. Personally, I think that’s pretty darn high. That knight from The Seventh Seal had things all wrong. Instead of playing a dumb nerd game like chess, dude sho...
Danny Brown and Action Bronson are high. How high are they? 2 HIGH 2 DIE. Personally, I think that’s pretty darn high. That knight from The Seventh Seal had things all wrong. Instead of playing a dumb nerd game like chess, dude should have rolled a mega-blunt and spewed weed smoke in Death’s face. If you’re not a film buff, here’s a more contemporary example: take the movie Speed. Replace Keanu Reeves with Action Bronson and Danny Brown. Now, the movie is about two guys who must maintain a certain level of highness at all times, else a bus explodes. Also, I guess Action Bronson and Danny Brown are on the bus, smoking an endless supply of pot. Which is basically what they will probably be doing on their upcoming 2 HIGH 2 DIE tour. Brown and Bronson will begin their trip during September in Calgary, then will proceed to flaunt their immortality to another dozen or so cities. “Spread your healing smoke upon us, the unwashed masses” the unwashed masses will say. The two rappers will look down and say “Naaaaaah, we will be the only immortals alive.” After they laugh about their endless existence, they will tell everyone about the new projects they’ve got on the horizon. Brown’s long-awaited album Old will be coming out this fall on Fool’s Gold, while Bronson and producer Party Supplies will soon be dropping Blue Chips 2, the sequel to last year’s acclaimed mixtape that has a title you can probably figure out. Take note: Action Bronson is an immortal, so soon could be many decades from now. Danny Brown and Action Bronson dates: 09.10.13 - Calgary, AB - Republik 09.11.13 - Edmonton, AB - Union Hall 09.12.13 - Vancouver, BC - Vogue Theatre 09.17.13 - Denver, CO - Ogden Theatre 09.20.13 - Milwaukee, WI - The Rave II 09.22.13 - Minneapolis, MN - First Avenue 09.24.13 - Bloomington, IN - Bluebird Nightclub 09.25.13 - Grand Rapids, MI - The Intersection 09.27.13 - Philadelphia, PA - Theatre of the Living Arts 10.01.13 - Toronto, ON - The Danforth Music Hall 10.02.13 - Montreal, QC - Telus Theatre 10.03.13 - Boston, MA - Wilbur Theatre • Danny Brown: https://www.facebook.com/xdannyxbrownx • Action Bronson: http://www.actionbronson.com
about 1 month ago
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Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} One might reasonably assume that a professed love of movies wouldn’t be exclusive of any era, that a movie fan would be open as much to the joys of classic cinema as to the thrills that can be generated by modern films. But that may not always be the case. In introducing The Muriels Hall of Fame, an off-shoot of the Muriel Awards, in which I proudly participate every year, Muriels cofounder Paul Clark notes that an enthusiastic compulsion to look back and dig deep into the treasures of the past may not be as compelling as you’d expect. Clark quotes critic Mike D'Angelo, who recently complained about the tendency of some moviegoers toward a certain sort of myopia:“By far the most galling aspect… is seeing people condescend to movies made before they were born. Often, they’ll allow that some canonical masterpiece was hugely influential, or “good for its time,” but in the next breath confess that they just can’t take it seriously given the enormous advances that have been made in the decades since.”Each year the Muriels have always reserved a spot in the ceremony for a 50th anniversary award, highlighting great achievements from a half-century previous. In that spirit, Clark and Steve Carlson have initiated the Muriels Hall of Fame to keep the spotlight more firmly fixed on the classics that still speak to us from several generations past, but which may be in some way daunting or otherwise uninteresting to moviegoers, many of whom might consider anything made before 1990 as “old.”Over the next two and a half weeks Clark will announce this year’s inaugural MHoF inductees, one each day, beginning with previous Muriel anniversary award winners. Clark promises that many of the usual suspects will naturally be present in the accounting, but he also says that some surprises are also afoot. Muriel voters have also been asked to contribute some writing about the movies they’ve voted for this year. Right now you can read Phil Dyess-Nugent on past Muriel Anniversary winner The Seventh Seal and Peter Labuza on Vertigo. And coming soon, my own piece on a great and influential movie dear to my heart—you’ll just have to keep clicking to find out what it is.So stay tuned to the unveiling of the inaugural inductees into the Muriels Hall of Fame. If a title comes up that you haven’t yet seen or is already a favorite, I hope you’ll be inspired to check it out for yourself or revisit it and be seduced all over again. **********************************************
3 months ago