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Tracee Chimo and Michael Zegen will square off at the Laura Pels Theatre for one more week.
Tracee Chimo and Michael Zegen will square off at the Laura Pels Theatre for one more week.
about 3 hours ago
Mark Marcante will direct.
Mark Marcante will direct.
about 3 hours ago
The musical comedy gets three invitation-only readings by a stellar cast.
The musical comedy gets three invitation-only readings by a stellar cast.
about 3 hours ago
Plus, a look at the celebs coming to Broadway this season and an interview with Big Fish book writer John August.
Plus, a look at the celebs coming to Broadway this season and an interview with Big Fish book writer John August.
about 3 hours ago
The productions received the annual "Extraordinary Excellence in Diversity on Broadway" Award.
The productions received the annual "Extraordinary Excellence in Diversity on Broadway" Award.
about 3 hours ago
Director Sheldon Epps plans to draw out the racial tensions in Reginald Rose's iconic play.
Director Sheldon Epps plans to draw out the racial tensions in Reginald Rose's iconic play.
about 3 hours ago
As I blogged about yesterday, SEO may be one of the most important tools you can use to help make you money (appearing higher on the organic rankings should get you more clicks) AND simultaneously save you money (the higher you appear or...
As I blogged about yesterday, SEO may be one of the most important tools you can use to help make you money (appearing higher on the organic rankings should get you more clicks) AND simultaneously save you money (the higher you appear organically, the less you have to spend on Adwords, etc.). [A conspiracy theory side note - Goog benefits when businesses don't appear at the top of rankings - because then those companies have to buy more advertising from Google itself.  Seems a bit unfair, IMHO.  All that Google has to do is change its algorithm and poof - more advertising dollars come their way.  Are you listening, Congress?] Since we can’t wait for legislation to deal with the above issue, we have to learn how to play within the Google search rules.  How do you keep your show high on Google’s love list?  Here are three four secrets (which I call “The Three Rs” and one bonus) I’ve discovered as I’ve watched my show’s rankings rise and fall over the years. The Three Rs of SEO for Broadway Producers 1.  Respect. To be qualified as a quality website by the Google spiders (the electronic insects that crawl the web examining the strengths and weaknesses of websites), you’ve got to earn Google’s R-E-S-P-E-C-T.  There are two ways to do that. The first is simple, but requires some time.  You’ve got to “age” your site.  Google examines websites like a sommelier examines wine.  The older the better.  If you’ve been around for awhile, Google gives you credit.  It’s like your local restaurant that has been “serving since 1957.”  This is why I advise everyone who has even an idea for show to get the domain name lickity split . . . and then to put up a starter site immediately thereafter.  Even if the show is four years away!  Those four years of Google knowing you are around will help (Need an example?  Check out what I did for A Few Good Men.  Simple but helpful.) The second way to get respect is to have other websites link to you.  This is an old school SEO trick, but from what I see, Google hasn’t changed this part of its algorithm and still rewards sites with lots of links.  What they have gotten better about is figuring out fraudulent links.  It used to be that you could hire a company overseas to plant links in message boards and in comment sections all over the web, and poof, your rankings rose.  You could order up links by the 1000s.  Google wised up, and actually started to penalize companies for this kind of link abuse.  (I wish some of the link-spammers that still hit my site daily would realize they are doing more harm than good nowadays).  So what can you do?  Go back to link sharing the good old fashioned way.  Produce good content that people want to link to organically, or ask for link shares from sites that are similar to yours (getting a link to your Broadway related site from a mattress salesman doesn’t mean as much as it does coming from another Broadway related site). Just remember that the SEO world is like the mob. Respect can’t be bought.  It has to be earned. 2.  Relevant This one is pretty simple, but it’s something I have to remember constantly when composing content for any of my sites.  If you want people to find you when they search for “Early Hungarian Cabinetmaking” then you better have a lot of content on the site that discusses “Early Hungarian Cabinetmaking.”  Those terms better appear often on multiple pages of your website.  Now, I know what you’re thinking . . . “I’ll just repeat those words over and over again in various places on my site and presto!  Instant organic search traffic!”  Google is on to that game too.  It used to be you could toss terms on your home page .  . sometimes hidden so the viewer couldn’t even see them . . . to trick the Google spiders into thinking you talked about whatever term it was more often than you
about 7 hours ago
A date for the ceremony has been set.
A date for the ceremony has been set.
about 7 hours ago
Guests also included comedian Robert Klein and singer Melissa Manchester.
Guests also included comedian Robert Klein and singer Melissa Manchester.
about 7 hours ago
Photo (c) Andrew Eaton I’m meeting Clout Theatre in a café outside Battersea Arts Centre two days before the start of the first London run of its new show The Various Lives of Infinite Nullity. The 50-minute piece – devised by company me...
Photo (c) Andrew Eaton I’m meeting Clout Theatre in a café outside Battersea Arts Centre two days before the start of the first London run of its new show The Various Lives of Infinite Nullity. The 50-minute piece – devised by company members Jennifer Swingler, Sacha Plaige and George Ramsay (under the watchful eye of director Mine Çerçi and producer Helen Goodman) – was shortlisted for the 2013 Total Theatre Emerging Artist Award at The Edinburgh Fringe, a perhaps surprising second nomination in as many years. “The first time you think ‘OK, this is the first time we’ve been nominated so we’re emerging’. But when you’ve been nominated a second time you start to think ‘what does it actually mean to be emerging?’” Swingler explains. The group met as students in 2007 at L’Ecole Jaques Lecoq in Paris, and since then have been working together as a company: first in the French capital and more recently in London, to create work that they describe as a “celebration of the horrors of life”. Due to their recent relocation, Swingler adds that “’emerging’ for us was definitely the idea of emerging into the UK theatre scene”. Certainly the company has never been busier: “every day we have a conversation about marketing or finances or workshops or tours. It never stops”, laughs producer Goodman, who began her tenure with the company in January. Swingler notes that for new companies “there are no set rules for how to conduct yourself, and it’s really difficult in the first couple of years to figure out how you want to operate. If you don’t have a business head – which a lot of artistic people don’t – it’s a real learning experience.” The group – who share out administrative roles between themselves and still mostly work for free – found it difficult at first to request remuneration for their work. Ramsay recalls not really knowing how much to ask for the first time they decided to request a fee to perform, to which Swingler adds “you have to learn very quickly your own value. Companies think ‘we’re just starting out and we’ll do it for nothing’, and theatres totally take advantage of that. Artists have to look after themselves because nobody else will.” Though the group notes that requesting a certain amount of money for their work has sometimes felt “really shameful”, part of their ‘emerging’ process has had to be figuring out “when we stop being students doing this for fun, and when it becomes a professional thing”. Çerçi notes that this struggle can feel disheartening “in a world where money is the main criteria of success… we’re devoting so much time to this that we can’t really get other jobs, so it’s a Catch 22 in that you need another part-time or even full-time job to support yourself, but we have to give so much time to the company that you don’t have time to do either.” Plaige adds: “I guess financially this is where we think do we keep ‘emerging’ or do we just drop everything because we can’t continue, and I think this the critical point where either we decide to really invest, or you say ok, I need to make a living…” Luckily for Clout, Goodman is making it her mission to whip the finances into shape, secure more funding for the company and to make sure that they are paid for their work. Artistically, Plaige sees their repeat nomination as validating, as she feels Total Theatre “were looking to recognise companies that have their own language or world or are trying new things, so in a way the fact that we were nominated again this year makes me think maybe we are consolidating. You could be any company doing your first show – could be good could be bad – but it’s the one you make afterwards: what is that going to be?” Ramsey adds that the nice thing about the nominations is that “there’s a camaraderie between the companies listed,” and the group always makes sure to use their time in Edinburgh to “make connections, and get a measure of where we are right now in relation to everyone else doing theatre from aroun
about 7 hours ago