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There are many reasons why visual content is becoming more widely used in online marketing, including these 19 statistics. However, it's especially important for nonprofits because every person who supports, fundraises for, donates to, a...
There are many reasons why visual content is becoming more widely used in online marketing, including these 19 statistics. However, it's especially important for nonprofits because every person who supports, fundraises for, donates to, and is impacted by your organization is a story worth sharing to connect others to your mission. And also, let's not forget: Some of the most compelling content, more often than not, includes visuals. There are many nonprofits setting the example for using visual content in their social media, email, and website engagement strategies. To give you some examples, I've highlighted 10 nonprofits that are implementing visual content in unique ways using Pinterest. 1) Personal Ink (P.INK): Uses Pinterest as Its Website The P.INK Foundation uses Pinterest as its main website to which it sends all traffic to from its different marketing channels. The organization uses consistent branding as well as ways to connect with it directly via email and other social channels. 2) The Gates Foundation: Shares Favorite Videos The Gates Foundation shares its favorite inspiring videos on its Pinterest account, including several TED talks by both Bill and Melinda Gates. This serves as a good reminder that Pinterest isn’t only about sharing photos, but that it can also be a great way to share your stories using videos as well. 3) The Trevor Project: Promotes Merchandise Merchandise is a great tool for brand awareness. The Trevor Project dedicates a board to its “Trevor Gear,” including T-shirts, wristbands, and buttons, all with the Trevor Project's branding. 4) ASPCA: Thanks Its Sponsors The ASPCA uses Pinterest for a number of things, including thanking its sponsors, like West Elm and Subaru. This is a phenomenal way to show appreciation to those supporting your organization. It also gives your sponsors something to share to their networks so you can leverage their audiences as well. 5) Operation Smile: Highlights Celebrity Ambassadors Operation Smile has a dedicated board to those celebrities who support the organization, including those who have donated, volunteered, and attended its events. 6) Charity: water: Focuses on Unique Fundraisers Charity: water highlights its fundraisers on its “Creative Fundraising” board. This is an ideal method to show appreciation for your fundraisers and also lead by example and inspire others to be creative in how they fundraise. Like the sponsors, board fundraisers will be sure to share the pins of their campaigns to their networks. 7) American Red Cross: Shows History of Organization Educating your audience about the history of your organization can seem like a giant task. The American Red Cross, though, has a dedicated board sharing some of its history, including when the organization started and the different disaster relief events it's supported ov. 8) Jolkona: Highlights Trips to the Field Reporting from the field is a fantastic way to connect your supporters to the impact they are making. Jolkona highlights pictures and videos from its travels and events on a dedicated board. 9) Life Foundation: Shares Important Life Insurance Stats Sharing bite-size tips and statistics is simple on Pinterest. The Life Foundation has a variety of boards on different topics, including “Life Insurance 101,” to provide all the facts you’ll need to know about life insurance. 10) Grist: Spreads Awareness of Environmental News Grist shares environmental news on its website, but it also educates its audiences on how to be environmentally conscious. The group has a “Green Your Home” board with expert advice regarding how to reduce your carbon footprint. Got an interesting Pinterest board of your own, filled with amazing visual content? Tell us about it in the comments section below! Image credit: Roxanne Ready
about 3 hours ago
I’ve reviewed a lot of Google AdWords accounts at WordStream -- probably thousands -- and I see the same silly mistakes over and over again. These five rookie mistakes are the difference between high-performing accounts and ones that fai...
I’ve reviewed a lot of Google AdWords accounts at WordStream -- probably thousands -- and I see the same silly mistakes over and over again. These five rookie mistakes are the difference between high-performing accounts and ones that fail. If you’re not happy with your PPC results, consider this as a checklist to revamp your account. And if you’re making any of these super-common errors, it’s time to fix them. Rookie Mistake #1: Infrequent Logins The number-one reason most businesses fail at AdWords is they don’t sign in enough. PPC managers say they are doing work in their accounts, but when I look at the change history of the average AdWords account, the numbers tell a different story. In fact, only 1% of small businesses sign in to AdWords on a weekly basis. If you want AdWords to work for you, you have to commit to regularly logging in and actually working on your account. After all, it’s not going to manage itself. The good news is AdWords doesn’t have to take over your life. Since most advertisers do so little by way of account optimization, just logging in and working on it for 30 minutes each week (not all day, not every day) can make a big difference. Rookie Mistake #2: Not Optimizing for Quality Score Quality Score is often seen as a black box –- you can never know exactly how Google calculates it or exactly what your dynamic, behind-the-scenes Quality Score is for any given Google search. This has led many advertisers to erroneously conclude that Quality Score doesn’t matter as a metric. They’re dead wrong. Average Quality Score is an extremely good predictor of overall account success, as it directly affects your rankings and cost per click (CPC). Lower CPCs translate into lower costs per conversion, so optimizing for Quality Score is essentially the same as optimizing for costs. The savings can be pretty powerful: Unfortunately, though, the typical small business has an average Quality Score of 5, which offers no discount at all. Rookie Mistake #3: Ignoring Mobile Traffic AdWords advertisers have ignored the mobile space for far too long. It used to be really complicated to run your AdWords ads on mobile, because Google recommended creating entirely separate mobile campaigns. Now, with Enhanced Campaigns, it’s much, much easier. However, most PPC managers still make the mistake of thinking that mobile traffic is less valuable than desktop. We’ve found a couple of things to be true: Mobile users are quicker to convert. They often want something NOW, so you need to adjust your ads (messaging, call-to-action, extensions, etc.) accordingly to secure the conversion. For some businesses, mobile traffic is actually more valuable. We’ve seen some companies getting higher conversion rates from mobile clicks, at a lower cost per click. Test out those audiences and don’t assume mobile isn’t right for you. Fewer than one in five AdWords accounts has set up mobile-preferred ads. Make sure you’re the one that does it right. Rookie Mistake #4: Lousy Keyword Targeting While SEOs are flipping out about the “not provided” crisis, as an AdWords advertiser, you still have keyword data to spare. But most AdWords accounts suffer from poor keyword targeting. Some of the problems I see include: Overly broad keyword choices -- Long-tail keywords are more cost-effective, especially in competitive niches, but too many advertisers focus on broad head terms. Overly broad match types -- One in four small businesses only use the default broad match keyword type. This match type is great for Google, since it maximizes the number of clicks, but it's not so good for you, since those clicks are less likely to be relevant to your offering. Too few negative keywords -- Negative keywords help filter out unwanted, irrelevant clicks, so they’re a key cost containment measure. However, 20% of AdWords accounts don’t use any negative keywords at all. These targeting mistakes are part of the reason that the typical SMB wastes a fourth of their annual p
about 5 hours ago
Here’s an incredible statistic for you: Google’s 2012 gross revenue was an eye-opening $50.1 billion. The company had 44,777 folks on its roster last year, so this equates to more than a million dollars ($1,120,553) of revenu...
Here’s an incredible statistic for you: Google’s 2012 gross revenue was an eye-opening $50.1 billion. The company had 44,777 folks on its roster last year, so this equates to more than a million dollars ($1,120,553) of revenue per employee. Not bad. So how does Twitter compare? Last year, Twitter’s 2,000 staff members tallied $317 million in gross revenue, which breaks down to $158,500 per person. In terms of profit, however, Twitter actually posted a loss in 2012, so each Twitter employee “lost” $40,000 overall. Only Zynga had a worse year amongst the top tech firms. continued… New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 8 hours ago
Many marketing pros are very well-versed in emailing prospective and current customers and getting them to become a customer or brand loyalist. Those who are new to the wide world of marketing and even some long-time marketers, however, ...
Many marketing pros are very well-versed in emailing prospective and current customers and getting them to become a customer or brand loyalist. Those who are new to the wide world of marketing and even some long-time marketers, however, don't fully understand how to develop effective transactional emails. If you're scratching your head now -- either because you're not sure what transactional email are or you're not sure how they differ from other emails -- this is the post for you. While this email type has been discussed in-depth on this blog in the past, we haven’t really delved into the basics of them -- until now. Let's all get caught up to speed on exactly what transactional emails are and why they're an important part of your email marketing. What Are Transactional Emails? First of all, they're not just associated with ecommerce marketers (a common misconception). A transactional email is one a company sends to contacts, leads, or customers to help facilitate or follow-up on some kind of action the user has taken on their website. Just what kind of action are we talking about, though? Well, it could be one of many things. Here are the most common actions that might trigger a transactional email: An order confirmation A kickback email for downloading a content asset -- like a whitepaper or an ebook A thank-you email for completing an action Some transactional emails may prompt the recipient to take some sort of action, while others simply serve as a confirmation of some sort and require no action. These messages are simply a way of confirming something happened as a result of user action, or sometimes, even communicating additional information related to the action they took. For instance, one might combine a thank-you transactional email with an offer download email -- and even include an upsell, a cross-sell, or other information that helps move the recipient further down the sales funnel. We do this sometimes here at HubSpot -- a visitor downloads an ebook, they receive a thank-you email that also includes a link to the ebook, and we then insert another ebook or offer they might be interested in reading along with it. And it turns out, that's a pretty smart thing to do, too. Transactional Emails Provide a Great Marketing Opportunity Many businesses assume they should only be sending transactional emails to customers when they purchase something from them. But remember, you don't have to be an ecommerce marketer to send a transactional email -- it can be sent for any meaningful transaction, whether money's exchanged or not. And that's where a huge opportunity presents itself to marketers. A transactional email is typically sent after a significant action is taken by a visitor to your website -- an action that denotes they trust you, are interested in you, and want whatever it is they signed up for. That is why transactional emails have among the highest open rates of all email types -- because the recipient it interested in the contents of that email. If your recipients are opening your transactional emails, then it's an excellent opportunity to provide additional information that you want those readers to know about your company. Do you do anything creative to take your transactional emails to the next level and help them do more for your business? Share your ideas in the comments! Image credit: Jon Ashcroft
about 8 hours ago
It’s only in the last decade that people have been able to make a solid living solely out of being a blogger, whether their milieu is food, arts, travel, tech or something else. Social media is certainly an integral part of blogg...
It’s only in the last decade that people have been able to make a solid living solely out of being a blogger, whether their milieu is food, arts, travel, tech or something else. Social media is certainly an integral part of bloggers’ success, in terms of promotion, networking, and finance. Below, check out Dublin’s Sandymount Hotel’s infographic profile of the modern travel blogger. continued… New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 10 hours ago
With Google making 10 algorithm changes in the last four months and keyword data getting harder to come by, it may be ideal for marketers to take a step back and get back to SEO basics. Despite the revolving door of new algorithms and se...
With Google making 10 algorithm changes in the last four months and keyword data getting harder to come by, it may be ideal for marketers to take a step back and get back to SEO basics. Despite the revolving door of new algorithms and search engine policies, the fundamentals of getting your content found have remained pretty consistent. So, let's save the hand-wringing and future-predicting for another day and keep it simple. Here’s what you need to know to optimize your blog posts for search. Turn Keyword Research Into Blog Topics No company can rank for everything (believe me, we’ve tried). Therefore, the best SEO strategy is to focus on a few key phrases or topics that are critical to your company. Start with a topic you really want to rank well for -- in our case, it might be “inbound marketing." Then, put yourself in the shoes of your prospective customers (or better yet, interview a few). What would they search for that would bring them to your doorstep? What questions or challenges do they have that you can help address? People are increasingly using full sentences or long phrases to find the content they need. With the proliferation of content, a simple search for “cars,” for example, is not going to get searchers the results they need. Thus, searches have become far more detailed and specific -- “what to know before buying a car,” “most trustworthy Volvo dealerships near Boston,” and so forth. As a result of these more complex searches, Google has actually changed its algorithm to better fit conversational questions from searchers. This is good news for blogs, which are designed by nature to be educational, answer questions, and provide background info. It’s also good news because identifying these questions can give you a veritable hit list of search-friendly posts to write. Optimize Blog Post Headlines and URL Once you have your list of blog posts, you’ll want to make sure you’ve optimized the headlines. Keywords do best when they’re at the front of the headline. So, for example, if we’re trying to rank our content to appear for searches about inbound marketing: "Inbound Marketing: Everything You Need to Know to Get Started" will do better than "Everything You Need to Know to Get Started With Inbound Marketing." Keywords are important, but you also want to write the sort of headline that is likely to get clicked and shared frequently. The frequency with which a piece of content gets shared can positively impact its ranking on search engine result pages. In fact, in recent years, social elements have been increasingly important to search. We’ll touch upon that more below in the Social Search section. You might want to test different headlines to see what style or format generates the most activity for you. One of the reasons list headlines, like “10 Reasons You Should Have Your Cake and Eat it Too,” are so common online is that they tend to attract more clicks. Don’t force your content to fit a common practice, though. Instead, try out different headline structures. You may find that questions or humor work best for generating clicks and shares on social media. Additionally, keep your headlines short -- ideally, under 65 characters -- so that they don't get truncated in search engine results. In addition to the title, search engines use the words in a page’s URL to determine if it's relevant to the search at-hand. So if you are able to edit the structure of your URLs, it’s imperative to make sure that you’re including keywords there too. The URL serves as a nice backup for your headline in optimizing for keywords. You may decide that you want to be a bit more creative with your headline to generate more interest as the post gets promoted across your marketing channel. If you do that, a good URL structure can help. The same rules apply for positioning the keywords in your URL. Keep keywords early and separate them by dashes. The URL hubspot.com/inbound-marketing is more effective than hubspot.com/inboundmarketing. C
about 11 hours ago
Twitter Creator, Co-Founder, Chairman, and former CEO Jack Dorsey working at Facebook? It almost happened in 2007, New York Times Columnist and Reporter Nick Bilton wrote in his upcoming book, Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Pow...
Twitter Creator, Co-Founder, Chairman, and former CEO Jack Dorsey working at Facebook? It almost happened in 2007, New York Times Columnist and Reporter Nick Bilton wrote in his upcoming book, Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal, set for a November release by Penguin/Portfolio. continued… New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 12 hours ago
New research from Boston-based restaurant social media company Privy demonstrates that people on Twitter are more interested in being influenced to spend money. From tracking how effective their clients’ online marketing campaign...
New research from Boston-based restaurant social media company Privy demonstrates that people on Twitter are more interested in being influenced to spend money. From tracking how effective their clients’ online marketing campaigns are at driving in-store revenue over two years, the Privy team found that Twitter surprisingly outweighs both Facebook and e-mail marketing in actually leading to sales. continued… New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 12 hours ago
A lot can change in three years. Back in 2010, Twitter was a relative minnow compared to the global communications and media powerhouse, sitting on the verge of a closely-watched IPO, that it has become today. Three years ago, Facebook ...
A lot can change in three years. Back in 2010, Twitter was a relative minnow compared to the global communications and media powerhouse, sitting on the verge of a closely-watched IPO, that it has become today. Three years ago, Facebook had about one-third of the number of users that it has today. As of right now, both of these platforms dominate social media, and social media marketing. But what about three years from now? continued… New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
about 14 hours ago
When I created my first Facebook ad ever, I had no clue what I was doing. I picked target demos at random (The more people who see my ad, the better!) and barely considered the difference between CPM and CPC. All I knew was that my boss ...
When I created my first Facebook ad ever, I had no clue what I was doing. I picked target demos at random (The more people who see my ad, the better!) and barely considered the difference between CPM and CPC. All I knew was that my boss asked me to make a Facebook ad -- now -- and it was my duty to get it up as fast as possible. No goals, no objectives, no metrics even entered my thought process. And I know I'm not the only person who has been confused by Facebook advertising -- heck, we've even written a whole ebook trying to quell some of that confusion. I'm not surprised that people are so concerned about getting their Facebook ads right -- their budgets and jobs are on the line if those ads don't drive positive business results. Luckily, now, it's going to be a lot easier for the average marketer like myself to advertise on Facebook. Today, Facebook announced a brand new way for marketers to create and measure ads. Now, people can create and measure ads all based on one goal, which Facebook deems "objective-based ad buying and reporting." I know that's a lot of jargon in one sentence, so let me break down how the new tool works. Objective-Based Ad Buying: Decoded Basically, when you go to create a new ad, you'll be asked about which objective you want to accomplish with your Facebook ads. You can choose among these: Clicks to Website Website Conversions Page Post Engagement Page Likes App Installs App Engagement In-store Offer claims Event Responses Then, based on your objective, Facebook makes recommendations on which types of ads you should create to meet that objective. Facebook gives an example of a Page post link ad that could be recommended to drive clicks to your website, for instance. After you select your objective and ads you want to run, Facebook's Ads Manager will display the chosen objective, the number of times it was met, and the cost per stated objective. Basically, Facebook's new tool turns it into a consultative resource for marketers so you can optimize and assess your ads' business impact from the get-go. Pretty sweet, huh? According to Facebook, this update should be live, but at the time of publishing, we haven't seen this roll out to our accounts. So keep checking back to see if you have the new layout soon. Why Marketers Should Care Cool! So now Facebook is helping you set up goals and track your success -- this seems like a no-brainer news story. This means all of us marketers can sit back and let the social network drive our ad campaigns ... right? Wrong. While this new feature is exciting and helpful, we can't take our hands off the wheel just yet. Be careful not to extrapolate the advertising data to the rest of your marketing activities. For example, if you are using multiple data sources, you might find that Facebook's Ads Manager metrics show that links drive clicks while your Facebook Page organic posts' links don't. So be sure that you're supplementing the objective-based ad data with other information to get a robust picture of your marketing's success. Besides that one caveat, this update seems like a very helpful feature that will help Facebook Advertisers create ads the inbound way -- something that we can't help but celebrate. What do you think of this update? How would you use this new feature in your marketing? Leave your ideas in the comments below!
1 day ago