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The intense political polarization of the United States is most clearly reflected by the dysfunctional nature of the federal government. At a more local scale, it is seen as well in the growing movement to create new states by splitting ...
The intense political polarization of the United States is most clearly reflected by the dysfunctional nature of the federal government. At a more local scale, it is seen as well in the growing movement to create new states by splitting existing ones. Most of these cases involve the desire of people in rural, conservative counties to secede from the more ...This post is from GeoCurrents
about 3 hours ago
"Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Va., 1958-63. Eero Saarinen, architect. Mobile lounges." A sort of giant rolling jetway (mostly out of frame at left) that carried passengers at Dulles from terminal to plane. The stair truck sup...
"Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Va., 1958-63. Eero Saarinen, architect. Mobile lounges." A sort of giant rolling jetway (mostly out of frame at left) that carried passengers at Dulles from terminal to plane. The stair truck supported the gangway. 120mm color transparency by Balthazar Korab. View full size.
about 6 hours ago
June 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. First aid group in school dispensary." Does the post-secondary version of this course involve beer? Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
June 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. First aid group in school dispensary." Does the post-secondary version of this course involve beer? Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
about 6 hours ago
Today from the J Paul Getty Museum, a statuette of Mars-Cobannus dating to cAD125-175. The Latin inscription on the base reads, "Sacred to the venerable god Cobannus, Lucius Maccius Aeternus, duumvir, [dedicated this] in accordance wi...
Today from the J Paul Getty Museum, a statuette of Mars-Cobannus dating to cAD125-175. The Latin inscription on the base reads, "Sacred to the venerable god Cobannus, Lucius Maccius Aeternus, duumvir, [dedicated this] in accordance with a vow." The statue probably represents Cobannus, a local deity who was equivalent to Mars, the Roman god of war. The family of Lucius Maccius Aeternus is known from other inscriptions in Gaul.
about 17 hours ago
Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum has acquired a rare Roman sarcophagus decorated with sea creatures and engraved with a desperately sad inscription. It was made in Italy out of expensive white Carrara marble around 165-180 A.D. It...
Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum has acquired a rare Roman sarcophagus decorated with sea creatures and engraved with a desperately sad inscription. It was made in Italy out of expensive white Carrara marble around 165-180 A.D. It is 5’8″ long and has carved sea centaurs holding the inscription on both sides while sea nymphs ride on their fishy hindquarters and cupids hover in the corners. This beautiful coffin was the final resting place of two young children who left behind a despairing mother. The Latin inscription tells the tragic tale. To the departed spirits of Laberia Alexandria, who lived 10 years, 5 months, 7 days, and of Sylvanus, who lived 6 years, 5 months, 14 days. In this sarcophagus, the unhappy mother buried two bodies, her children, forever to live in sorrow. She survives her children and leads a most miserable life — her husband snatched away by death, the father of these poor little ones. The second paragraph is a four-line poem in dactylic hexameter in the original Latin. To welcome the sarcophagus to the Mead collection, Amherst alumnus, professor, former U.S. poet laureate and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Wilbur composed a new verse translation of the poem in iambic pentameter: In this sarcophagus, two children lie Whose mother’s eyes shall nevermore be dry. Her husband’s gone, who sired these luckless dears. His childless widow faces empty years. Richard Wilbur recited the poem when the sarcophagus made its official debut last month at opening of This Just In! Additions to the Collection from Pompeii to Today, an exhibition that runs through December 29th, 2013. After the exhibition is over, the sarcophagus will remain on permanent display. The Mead is very fortunate to have had the opportunity to acquire such a compelling and rare piece. One of the things that makes it so rare is that it’s in compliance with the UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property because it left Italy in the early 20th century. Until last year, it was in the permanent collection of the Princeton University Art Museum which is where the Mead acquired it. In an era when most antiquities with a legally and ethically “clean” provenance are securely held onto by museums, the Mead was fortunate to have Sarcophagus with Sea Creatures become available for purchase. “I never imagined, in my entire career, having the opportunity to participate in a museum acquisition of such an important antiquity,” says Mead director, Dr. Elizabeth E. Barker. Given the infrequency with which works that meet the strict criteria of the UNESCO convention concerning antiquities become available to museums, Barker remains “gratefully amazed to have secured such a rare specimen for Amherst.” Its availability, says the chair of the Mead advisory board, Charles (Sandy) Wilkes, was recognized as “perhaps a once-in-a-generation opportunity to purchase a significant work that helps strengthen the Mead’s collection in a clearly important area.” It appears to have been a private sale between the two institutions, or at least, I could find no evidence of a public sale or auction, nor is anybody talking about how much money changed hands. There’s little information about the provenance of the sarcophagus either, not where it was discovered or when it exactly it was sold and exported from Italy. All we know is that it was used as a fountain or watering trough for some time before doing tours of duty as a decorative element in the courtyards of two Roman palazzos. (The sarcophagus as water fountain thing is surprisingly common. We had one in the play yard of my elementary school in Rome. Nobody thought anything of it at the time, although in hindsight it seems kind of amazing to me that we drank from a tap whose basin was an ancient coffin.) In August of this year,
about 18 hours ago
Spring 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. Social studies class. Students study in groups of six or eight, each group picking own subject." Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
Spring 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. Social studies class. Students study in groups of six or eight, each group picking own subject." Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
about 19 hours ago
1 day ago
Boston circa 1906. "Maverick Square and tunnel entrance." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
Boston circa 1906. "Maverick Square and tunnel entrance." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.
1 day ago
HOME EXHIBIT PLANNED Dwelling Rises on Terrace in Rockefeller Center NEW YORK -- On the second-floor terrace of the International Building at 51st Street near Fifth Avenue, a seven-room dwelling is under construction as the f...
HOME EXHIBIT PLANNED Dwelling Rises on Terrace in Rockefeller Center NEW YORK -- On the second-floor terrace of the International Building at 51st Street near Fifth Avenue, a seven-room dwelling is under construction as the focal point in what is designed to be a home-building center and exhibit. It is being erected by the Rockefeller Home Center, successor to the Permanent Exhibition of Decorative Arts and Crafts (PEDAC). The dwelling is of modern design by Edward D. Stone and the exterior is of redwood. In the first floor is a "three-purpose" room with a glass-enclosed side opening onto a terrace. Construction of the exhibition house, which is sponsored by Collier's magazine, is under direction of Irons & Reynolds, contractors. -- News item, May 16, 1940 July 15, 1940. "Collier's House at PEDAC, New York City. Exterior from below. Dan Cooper, decorator; Edward Durrell Stone, architect." Large-format acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner. View full size.
1 day ago
An admission ticket to an art installation called “Totalitarian Zone,” which was held inside the pedestal of what was once Stalin’s monument in Prague. Dated 18–31 October 1990. I’m pretty sure that’s the sp...
An admission ticket to an art installation called “Totalitarian Zone,” which was held inside the pedestal of what was once Stalin’s monument in Prague. Dated 18–31 October 1990. I’m pretty sure that’s the space shuttle. There’s a lovely poster for the same event on the Facebook page of Linhart’s Foundation, which was one of the event’s producers. My thanks to the translator Alex Zucker for pointing the poster out to me. If this image were included in an extra-illustrated binding of the novel Necessary Errors, it might follow page 177. (For an explanation of extra-illustration, click here.)
1 day ago